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Rose Cottage Summer Cabin

Rosemary

Rose Cottage Summer Cabin

Sightseeing
In Nelly’s Kitchen Café visitors can warm up with good quality food and beverages. Hot food and delicious coffee make Nelly's cafe the perfect place to relax after taking a trip up the ancient Loughcrew Complex. On sunny day sit back and enjoy a glass of wine in the courtyard.
Loughcrew Megalithic Centre
In Nelly’s Kitchen Café visitors can warm up with good quality food and beverages. Hot food and delicious coffee make Nelly's cafe the perfect place to relax after taking a trip up the ancient Loughcrew Complex. On sunny day sit back and enjoy a glass of wine in the courtyard.
Girley Bog is a site of considerable conservation significance as it comprises raised bog – a rare habitat in Europe and one that is becoming increasingly scarce and under threat in Ireland. The loop covers a combination of forest and bogland – and has been developed as an eco-walk. The main element of the loop is within the bogland where there is a wonderful variety of birdlife, plants and animals.
Girley Bog
Girley Bog is a site of considerable conservation significance as it comprises raised bog – a rare habitat in Europe and one that is becoming increasingly scarce and under threat in Ireland. The loop covers a combination of forest and bogland – and has been developed as an eco-walk. The main element of the loop is within the bogland where there is a wonderful variety of birdlife, plants and animals.
Though best known as the seat of the High Kings of Ireland, the Hill of Tara has been an important site since the late Stone Age when a passage-tomb was constructed there. Tara was at the height of its power as a political and religious centre in the early centuries after Christ. Attractions include an audio-visual show and guided tours of the site.
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Hill of Tara
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Though best known as the seat of the High Kings of Ireland, the Hill of Tara has been an important site since the late Stone Age when a passage-tomb was constructed there. Tara was at the height of its power as a political and religious centre in the early centuries after Christ. Attractions include an audio-visual show and guided tours of the site.
The Loughcrew Cairns site is one of the four main passage tomb sites in Ireland, thought to date from about 3300 BC. The sites consist of cruciform chambers covered in most instances by a mound. A unique style of megalithic petroglyphs are seen there, including lozenge shapes, leaf shapes, as well as circles, some surrounded by radiating lines. The site is spread across three hilltops, Carnbane East, Carnbane West, and Patrickstown. The Irish name for the site is Sliabh na Caillí, which means "mountain of the witch". Legend has it that the monuments were created when a giant witch, striding across the land, dropped her cargo of large stones from her apron. The orthostats and structural stones of the monuments tend to be made of local green gritstone, which was soft enough to carve, but also vulnerable to vandalism. Situated just 3km east of Oldcastle in County Meath, the tombs are spread out over three different hills. Cairn T is one of the best preserved and most accessible tombs at Loughcrew and appears to be the central tomb of the whole complex. It faces the rising sun at the vernal (March) and autumnal (September) equinoxes which shines through the passage to illuminate symbols carved into the back wall of the chamber, corbelled roof and stunning examples of Neolithic art. This tomb is reputed to be the resting place of Ollamh Fodhla a legendary King of Ireland. During the vernal and autumnal equinoxes, people traditionally gather at dawn to watch sunlight enter the Cairn T chamber and illuminate the interior of the tomb. A site of considerable historical importance in Ireland, Loughcrew Cairns is one of the jewels in the crown of the Boyne Valley.
Loughcrew Cairns
The Loughcrew Cairns site is one of the four main passage tomb sites in Ireland, thought to date from about 3300 BC. The sites consist of cruciform chambers covered in most instances by a mound. A unique style of megalithic petroglyphs are seen there, including lozenge shapes, leaf shapes, as well as circles, some surrounded by radiating lines. The site is spread across three hilltops, Carnbane East, Carnbane West, and Patrickstown. The Irish name for the site is Sliabh na Caillí, which means "mountain of the witch". Legend has it that the monuments were created when a giant witch, striding across the land, dropped her cargo of large stones from her apron. The orthostats and structural stones of the monuments tend to be made of local green gritstone, which was soft enough to carve, but also vulnerable to vandalism. Situated just 3km east of Oldcastle in County Meath, the tombs are spread out over three different hills. Cairn T is one of the best preserved and most accessible tombs at Loughcrew and appears to be the central tomb of the whole complex. It faces the rising sun at the vernal (March) and autumnal (September) equinoxes which shines through the passage to illuminate symbols carved into the back wall of the chamber, corbelled roof and stunning examples of Neolithic art. This tomb is reputed to be the resting place of Ollamh Fodhla a legendary King of Ireland. During the vernal and autumnal equinoxes, people traditionally gather at dawn to watch sunlight enter the Cairn T chamber and illuminate the interior of the tomb. A site of considerable historical importance in Ireland, Loughcrew Cairns is one of the jewels in the crown of the Boyne Valley.
This inland lighthouse was designed by Henry Aaron Baker designer of the King’s Inn, Dublin for the First Earl of Bective in memory of his father Sir Thomas Taylor in 1791 and provide work during the time of a local famine. The plaque reads: 'This pillar was designed by Henry Aaron Baker Esq. architect was executed by Mr. Joseph Beck stone cutter Mr. Owen Mc Cabe head mason Mr. Bartle Reilly overseer Anno 1791'. At 30m (100ft) high, on the summit of the Commons of Lloyd, from 428 ft above sea level one can see magnificent views of the surrounding countryside as far as the Mourne Mountains in County Down, Northern Ireland on a clear day. The Spire is said to have been used to view horse racing and the hunt in the 19th century. Inside there is a 164-step spiral staircase, with a central protective cage. The plaque on the east side of the Spire carries the Headfort Coat of Arms with the family crest – Consequitur quodquinque petit -(He follows what he seeks). The spire stands on the site of an Iron Age ring fort but evidence is mounting to show that the site dates further back to the Bronze Age. The hill was known as Mullach Aiti, which graduates to Mulloyde and to the current day Lloyd. The Hillfort guarded the approaches from the Kingdom of Bréifne (Cavan) to the ancient Kingdom of Midhe (Meath). The legendary Queen Maeve (Medbh) was said to camp here with her armies on her way to steal Ulster's prize stud bull in the story of Táin Bó Cúailnge ("The Cattle Raid of Cooley"). Edward The Bruce also camped here following his victory at the Battle of Kells in 1314. During the times of the Great Famine, destitute people lived on the hill. The community park (The People’s Park) includes the - Paupers Graveyard - in which many victims of the mid-19th century famine lie buried. On visiting the Spire - one can also take the Ringfort and Blackwater River Looped Walk.
Spire of Lloyd
This inland lighthouse was designed by Henry Aaron Baker designer of the King’s Inn, Dublin for the First Earl of Bective in memory of his father Sir Thomas Taylor in 1791 and provide work during the time of a local famine. The plaque reads: 'This pillar was designed by Henry Aaron Baker Esq. architect was executed by Mr. Joseph Beck stone cutter Mr. Owen Mc Cabe head mason Mr. Bartle Reilly overseer Anno 1791'. At 30m (100ft) high, on the summit of the Commons of Lloyd, from 428 ft above sea level one can see magnificent views of the surrounding countryside as far as the Mourne Mountains in County Down, Northern Ireland on a clear day. The Spire is said to have been used to view horse racing and the hunt in the 19th century. Inside there is a 164-step spiral staircase, with a central protective cage. The plaque on the east side of the Spire carries the Headfort Coat of Arms with the family crest – Consequitur quodquinque petit -(He follows what he seeks). The spire stands on the site of an Iron Age ring fort but evidence is mounting to show that the site dates further back to the Bronze Age. The hill was known as Mullach Aiti, which graduates to Mulloyde and to the current day Lloyd. The Hillfort guarded the approaches from the Kingdom of Bréifne (Cavan) to the ancient Kingdom of Midhe (Meath). The legendary Queen Maeve (Medbh) was said to camp here with her armies on her way to steal Ulster's prize stud bull in the story of Táin Bó Cúailnge ("The Cattle Raid of Cooley"). Edward The Bruce also camped here following his victory at the Battle of Kells in 1314. During the times of the Great Famine, destitute people lived on the hill. The community park (The People’s Park) includes the - Paupers Graveyard - in which many victims of the mid-19th century famine lie buried. On visiting the Spire - one can also take the Ringfort and Blackwater River Looped Walk.
Causey Farm is home to pasture-fed sheep and cattle with 350 acres of rolling farmland. The Murtagh family breeds and trains sheepdogs and visitors can see them working in the fields during their visit. The small herd of Connemara ponies, natives of the west of Ireland calmly welcome a friendly pat or a handful of grass as they pass along the farm trails through fertile grassland. The nineteenth-century stone barns are used for traditional music workshops, take part or just soak up the atmosphere. Lilly Murtagh is renowned for her cooking and visitors can make traditional soda bread using her recipe. This is a real treat straight from the oven after you've spent time in the fresh air.
Causey Farm
Causey Farm is home to pasture-fed sheep and cattle with 350 acres of rolling farmland. The Murtagh family breeds and trains sheepdogs and visitors can see them working in the fields during their visit. The small herd of Connemara ponies, natives of the west of Ireland calmly welcome a friendly pat or a handful of grass as they pass along the farm trails through fertile grassland. The nineteenth-century stone barns are used for traditional music workshops, take part or just soak up the atmosphere. Lilly Murtagh is renowned for her cooking and visitors can make traditional soda bread using her recipe. This is a real treat straight from the oven after you've spent time in the fresh air.
Trim Castle is a stunning Norman castle on the south bank of the River Boyne. This magnificent site experienced a renaissance in 2000 when it was opened to the public after being excavated and restored. The movie Braveheart with Mel Gibson was filmed at Trim Castle in 1995. Access to the keep is by guided tour only for safety reasons. Visitors can learn more from interpretation panels and enjoy the impressive grounds of the castle. Trim, a designated heritage town, is renowned as one of Ireland's most beautiful towns and is believed to have more medieval buildings than any town in Ireland. With Trim Castle on its doorstep, it’s a town well worth a visit.
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Trim
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Trim Castle is a stunning Norman castle on the south bank of the River Boyne. This magnificent site experienced a renaissance in 2000 when it was opened to the public after being excavated and restored. The movie Braveheart with Mel Gibson was filmed at Trim Castle in 1995. Access to the keep is by guided tour only for safety reasons. Visitors can learn more from interpretation panels and enjoy the impressive grounds of the castle. Trim, a designated heritage town, is renowned as one of Ireland's most beautiful towns and is believed to have more medieval buildings than any town in Ireland. With Trim Castle on its doorstep, it’s a town well worth a visit.
In a tranquil, green valley in the village of Fore, about a 30-minute drive from Mullingar in County Westmeath, visitors can view the site where St Fechin founded a Christian monastery in the 7th Century. It’s believed that before his death, 300 monks lived in the community. Later, the monastery was set fire 12 times. Among the remains, visitors can see St Fechin’s church, built about 900. They will also find one of the 18 Fore crosses, which are spread out over 10 kilometres on roadways and in fields. There is also an information centre, public toilets and a pub. Parking is available for several cars near the church and priory ruins. Genealogy service also available. Local crafts and paintings are on sale. Local tour guides available on request.
Fore Abbey
In a tranquil, green valley in the village of Fore, about a 30-minute drive from Mullingar in County Westmeath, visitors can view the site where St Fechin founded a Christian monastery in the 7th Century. It’s believed that before his death, 300 monks lived in the community. Later, the monastery was set fire 12 times. Among the remains, visitors can see St Fechin’s church, built about 900. They will also find one of the 18 Fore crosses, which are spread out over 10 kilometres on roadways and in fields. There is also an information centre, public toilets and a pub. Parking is available for several cars near the church and priory ruins. Genealogy service also available. Local crafts and paintings are on sale. Local tour guides available on request.
Located near Oldcastle, County Meath, Loughcrew is a magical experience that combines history, beauty, fantasy and atmosphere. Visitors can take a walk through centuries of garden and landscape fantasy. The central area of approximately 2.5 hectares includes a lime avenue, extensive lawns and terraces, magnificent herbaceous border and physic border. Within the gardens stand a medieval mote and St Oliver Plunkett's family church and tower house. A host of enchanting features are displayed in a setting steeped in atmosphere and history. Meet Alice as she strolls through wonderland, encounter fairies and other creatures on woodland walks. Sculptures by acclaimed artist Ann Meldon Hugh and architectural treasures await around every corner. Facilities at Loughcrew include; Car and coach park, toilets, tearoom, book and gift shop, photographic display and education area. Wheelchair access in the Centre (and Gardens) is excellent appointment. It is advised to contact the property directly prior to making arrangements to visit.
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Loughcrew House, Gardens, Café, Adventure
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Located near Oldcastle, County Meath, Loughcrew is a magical experience that combines history, beauty, fantasy and atmosphere. Visitors can take a walk through centuries of garden and landscape fantasy. The central area of approximately 2.5 hectares includes a lime avenue, extensive lawns and terraces, magnificent herbaceous border and physic border. Within the gardens stand a medieval mote and St Oliver Plunkett's family church and tower house. A host of enchanting features are displayed in a setting steeped in atmosphere and history. Meet Alice as she strolls through wonderland, encounter fairies and other creatures on woodland walks. Sculptures by acclaimed artist Ann Meldon Hugh and architectural treasures await around every corner. Facilities at Loughcrew include; Car and coach park, toilets, tearoom, book and gift shop, photographic display and education area. Wheelchair access in the Centre (and Gardens) is excellent appointment. It is advised to contact the property directly prior to making arrangements to visit.
Discover Slane Castle, one of the most picturesque and historic buildings in Ireland. Set on the glorious grounds of a 1,500 acre estate, Slane Castle is the residence of one of Ireland’s most famous aristocrats, Henry Conyngham, Earl of Mount Charles. With the beautiful backdrop of the River Boyne and the lush green parklands of the estate, Slane Castle is an unmissable destination on any trip to the Boyne Valley. Watch world-class music acts at the iconic Slane summer concerts or catch one of the more intimate events throughout the year. Take a guided tour of the castle during the summer months and check out Slane Distillery. See the splendid grandeur of the castle with your personal tour guide and enjoy a tutored tasting of rich Irish whiskeys including Slane Irish Whiskey, produced at Slane Distillery.
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Slane
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Discover Slane Castle, one of the most picturesque and historic buildings in Ireland. Set on the glorious grounds of a 1,500 acre estate, Slane Castle is the residence of one of Ireland’s most famous aristocrats, Henry Conyngham, Earl of Mount Charles. With the beautiful backdrop of the River Boyne and the lush green parklands of the estate, Slane Castle is an unmissable destination on any trip to the Boyne Valley. Watch world-class music acts at the iconic Slane summer concerts or catch one of the more intimate events throughout the year. Take a guided tour of the castle during the summer months and check out Slane Distillery. See the splendid grandeur of the castle with your personal tour guide and enjoy a tutored tasting of rich Irish whiskeys including Slane Irish Whiskey, produced at Slane Distillery.
Balrath can be enjoyed throughout the year. However, the ideal time to visit Balrath is in late summer/early autumn when there are plenty of leaves and some fruits/nuts on the trees, some wildflowers still in bloom and also some insect life to be seen. Spring and summer are also good times, especially to see woodland wildflowers in their natural habitat. Woodlands are the natural state of Ireland’s landscape. Left alone, trees would eventually cover much of the country as they did thousands of years ago. Native species would have included oak, ash and yew, for example. As trees were cleared for farming and later, industry, our ancient woodlands vanished. Today we have the lowest percentage of wooded area in Europe.Much of Ireland’s landscape and the plants and animals (flora and fauna) that live here only arrived in the last 10,000 years, at the end of the last Ice Age. Because of this, Ireland does not have a huge diversity of species compared to Britain or the rest of Europe. There are many different types of woodland in Ireland. What we think of as a typical wooded area may be a relatively recent plantation. It may include several species such as beech, chestnut and sycamore that are not considered native trees, even though they have been with us for centuries.
Balrath
Balrath can be enjoyed throughout the year. However, the ideal time to visit Balrath is in late summer/early autumn when there are plenty of leaves and some fruits/nuts on the trees, some wildflowers still in bloom and also some insect life to be seen. Spring and summer are also good times, especially to see woodland wildflowers in their natural habitat. Woodlands are the natural state of Ireland’s landscape. Left alone, trees would eventually cover much of the country as they did thousands of years ago. Native species would have included oak, ash and yew, for example. As trees were cleared for farming and later, industry, our ancient woodlands vanished. Today we have the lowest percentage of wooded area in Europe.Much of Ireland’s landscape and the plants and animals (flora and fauna) that live here only arrived in the last 10,000 years, at the end of the last Ice Age. Because of this, Ireland does not have a huge diversity of species compared to Britain or the rest of Europe. There are many different types of woodland in Ireland. What we think of as a typical wooded area may be a relatively recent plantation. It may include several species such as beech, chestnut and sycamore that are not considered native trees, even though they have been with us for centuries.
A network of Visitor Information Points around the country, in conjunction with Fáilte Ireland, provide a tourist information service that includes local information on attractions, activities and events. The Kells Courthouse Tourism and Cultural Hub is a beautifully restored courthouse which is home to the tourism and arts hub. It hosts a special permanent Boyne Valley Exhibition designed to inspire tourist and local people to discover the heritage town with it’s wonderful history, arts and culture. Inside the building you will find a facsimile copy of The Book of Kells with a touch screen to have a closer look at some of the intricate art work featured throughout the book. There is a replica of The Kells Crozier and a 9th Century model of the Monastery and the town of Kells displaying what the monastery would have looked like during this medieval period. Also there are four multimedia touch screens which feature all the interesting sites of The Boyne Valley. Discover Boyne Valley staff are on hand to answer any enquiries on local history or local sites in the area. Information on other places of interest throughout Ireland is also available. Walking tours of the town are available through a local group “Kells-Walk-About”. Prior booking through the Courthouse is essential.
Courthouse
A network of Visitor Information Points around the country, in conjunction with Fáilte Ireland, provide a tourist information service that includes local information on attractions, activities and events. The Kells Courthouse Tourism and Cultural Hub is a beautifully restored courthouse which is home to the tourism and arts hub. It hosts a special permanent Boyne Valley Exhibition designed to inspire tourist and local people to discover the heritage town with it’s wonderful history, arts and culture. Inside the building you will find a facsimile copy of The Book of Kells with a touch screen to have a closer look at some of the intricate art work featured throughout the book. There is a replica of The Kells Crozier and a 9th Century model of the Monastery and the town of Kells displaying what the monastery would have looked like during this medieval period. Also there are four multimedia touch screens which feature all the interesting sites of The Boyne Valley. Discover Boyne Valley staff are on hand to answer any enquiries on local history or local sites in the area. Information on other places of interest throughout Ireland is also available. Walking tours of the town are available through a local group “Kells-Walk-About”. Prior booking through the Courthouse is essential.
Lough Ramor has exceptional access and facilities. The main lakeshore amenity area offers a variety of places to relax and picnic or simply meet up and enjoy the great outdoors. The lakeshore affords visitors and locals memorable sunsets all year round. From New Street in the centre of the town follow the sign for Lough Ramor where you will find ample parking available. Adjacent to the car park is walking access into Deerpark Forest. There is a second access point to the lake at the Lakeside Manor hotel on the Dublin Road – Here you will find a marina, and paddling area suitable for children with a man made beach.
Lough Ramor
Lough Ramor has exceptional access and facilities. The main lakeshore amenity area offers a variety of places to relax and picnic or simply meet up and enjoy the great outdoors. The lakeshore affords visitors and locals memorable sunsets all year round. From New Street in the centre of the town follow the sign for Lough Ramor where you will find ample parking available. Adjacent to the car park is walking access into Deerpark Forest. There is a second access point to the lake at the Lakeside Manor hotel on the Dublin Road – Here you will find a marina, and paddling area suitable for children with a man made beach.
Nestled along the shores of Lough Ramor lies an enchanting forest; unspoiled and untouched for centuries. Deerpark Forest is a tranquil land of history stretching five kilometres along Lough Ramor’s shoreline and venturing inland. This forest was the brainchild of the second Lord Headfort, Thomas Taylor, in the early 1800s. He had paved walkways constructed and imported trees from many parts of the world including Californian Redwoods; some of these trees still survive today. A variety of signed trails and circular routes, varying from 2.5km to 5.5km, leaves walkers spoiled for choice when taking a short family stroll or a long brisk walk. Make sure to keep an eye out for the magical fairies who live in the forest. If you look closely, you will see a number of fairy doors as you explore Deerpark. . Entry to the forest is via the adjacent Rugby Club, off the R194
Deerpark Forest Park
Nestled along the shores of Lough Ramor lies an enchanting forest; unspoiled and untouched for centuries. Deerpark Forest is a tranquil land of history stretching five kilometres along Lough Ramor’s shoreline and venturing inland. This forest was the brainchild of the second Lord Headfort, Thomas Taylor, in the early 1800s. He had paved walkways constructed and imported trees from many parts of the world including Californian Redwoods; some of these trees still survive today. A variety of signed trails and circular routes, varying from 2.5km to 5.5km, leaves walkers spoiled for choice when taking a short family stroll or a long brisk walk. Make sure to keep an eye out for the magical fairies who live in the forest. If you look closely, you will see a number of fairy doors as you explore Deerpark. . Entry to the forest is via the adjacent Rugby Club, off the R194
Lough Bane is a lake on the border of County Meath and County Westmeath in Ireland. The county border runs east–west through the centre of the lake. Lough Bane forms part of the Lough Bane and Lough Glass Special Area of Conservation.
Lough Bane
Lough Bane is a lake on the border of County Meath and County Westmeath in Ireland. The county border runs east–west through the centre of the lake. Lough Bane forms part of the Lough Bane and Lough Glass Special Area of Conservation.
Lough Lene is a lake situated in north County Westmeath, Ireland, between the villages of Castlepollard, Collinstown and Fore. It possesses a rich and varied history. It also boasts the existence of prehistoric burial sites, old ruins, many ancient village-type communal circular dwellings locally called ringforts, stiles, and mass paths. Lough Lene also has claims to being the home to kings and Vikings, such as Turgesius who had one of his forts upon the hill on the southwest overlooking the lake from the Ranaghan side, before being killed by Máel Sechnaill mac Maíl Ruanaid.
Lough Lene
Lough Lene is a lake situated in north County Westmeath, Ireland, between the villages of Castlepollard, Collinstown and Fore. It possesses a rich and varied history. It also boasts the existence of prehistoric burial sites, old ruins, many ancient village-type communal circular dwellings locally called ringforts, stiles, and mass paths. Lough Lene also has claims to being the home to kings and Vikings, such as Turgesius who had one of his forts upon the hill on the southwest overlooking the lake from the Ranaghan side, before being killed by Máel Sechnaill mac Maíl Ruanaid.
Lough Sheelin, in standard Irish Loch Síleann, is a limestone freshwater lough in central Ireland. The lake is a part of the River Inny course, and ultimately of the Shannon system.
Lough Sheelin
Lough Sheelin, in standard Irish Loch Síleann, is a limestone freshwater lough in central Ireland. The lake is a part of the River Inny course, and ultimately of the Shannon system.
Food scene
The Vanilla Pod has been rated in ‘Tom Doorley’s Top 100 Places To Eat in Ireland’ and has consistently featured in the coveted Bridgestone & Georgina Campbell Guide to Ireland. Although it is under the umbrella of the Headfort Arms, The Vanilla Pod is a self-contained contemporary restaurant that has earned itself regional national acclaim in its 10 plus years of operation. The ‘Pod’ as it is affectionately known amongst its loyal fan base offers a wonderful choice of International cuisine in a contemporary bistro atmosphere.
Vanilla Pod Restaurant Kells
The Vanilla Pod has been rated in ‘Tom Doorley’s Top 100 Places To Eat in Ireland’ and has consistently featured in the coveted Bridgestone & Georgina Campbell Guide to Ireland. Although it is under the umbrella of the Headfort Arms, The Vanilla Pod is a self-contained contemporary restaurant that has earned itself regional national acclaim in its 10 plus years of operation. The ‘Pod’ as it is affectionately known amongst its loyal fan base offers a wonderful choice of International cuisine in a contemporary bistro atmosphere.
Headfort Golf Club Bar & Restaurant provides an idylic setting to relax and enjoy the friendly atmosphere along with excellent food. The restaurant offers a full catering service throughout the day – 7 days a week and Head Chef Gerry offers a wide variety of home cooked food with locally sourced produce. The relaxed atmosphere of the clubhouse is a perfect place to enjoy that special occasion such as birthdays, anniversaries, or any family occasion. Reservations should be made in advance. Headfort Golf Club Bar & Restaurant is open every day for breakfast, lunch and dinner and specialises in a wide variety of snacks & sandwiches, main courses and Sunday lunches. Children’s menu available.
Headfort Golf Club
Headfort Golf Club Bar & Restaurant provides an idylic setting to relax and enjoy the friendly atmosphere along with excellent food. The restaurant offers a full catering service throughout the day – 7 days a week and Head Chef Gerry offers a wide variety of home cooked food with locally sourced produce. The relaxed atmosphere of the clubhouse is a perfect place to enjoy that special occasion such as birthdays, anniversaries, or any family occasion. Reservations should be made in advance. Headfort Golf Club Bar & Restaurant is open every day for breakfast, lunch and dinner and specialises in a wide variety of snacks & sandwiches, main courses and Sunday lunches. Children’s menu available.
The Bective is a relaxed, atmospheric restaurant in the heritage town of Kells. Open from Mondays to Saturdays from 5pm and from 3pm on Sundays, The Bective specialises in Irish beef and fish, with over 90% of food sourced within County Meath. The Bective has an outdoor seated terrace to the rear of the restaurant, including a children's play area.
The Bective Kells
81 Bective St
The Bective is a relaxed, atmospheric restaurant in the heritage town of Kells. Open from Mondays to Saturdays from 5pm and from 3pm on Sundays, The Bective specialises in Irish beef and fish, with over 90% of food sourced within County Meath. The Bective has an outdoor seated terrace to the rear of the restaurant, including a children's play area.
Khyber Garden is a great local restaurant serving delicious, authentic Indian cuisine!
Khyber Garden
11 Market Street
Khyber Garden is a great local restaurant serving delicious, authentic Indian cuisine!
Italian restaurant with great quality food and a friendly environment with helpful and friendly staff.
Amore Restaurant
Italian restaurant with great quality food and a friendly environment with helpful and friendly staff.
Chinese / Thai restaurant serving wonderful food and great service. Takeaway available.
Gin Ban
Chinese / Thai restaurant serving wonderful food and great service. Takeaway available.
Popular pizza takeaway & delivery service.
Apache Pizza Kells
Popular pizza takeaway & delivery service.
Major supermarket with great selection of food, including in-store bakery and deli counter.
SuperValu Kells - O'Brien's
Major supermarket with great selection of food, including in-store bakery and deli counter.
Retail chain selling a range of grocery items, including produce, meat & dairy.
ALDI
Retail chain selling a range of grocery items, including produce, meat & dairy.
Located in the surroundings of the Castle Cinema it offers something a little more than your average restaurant. A giant screen shows silent black and white movies whilst you enjoy good food in a fun environment!
Flicks Bar And Restaurant
Located in the surroundings of the Castle Cinema it offers something a little more than your average restaurant. A giant screen shows silent black and white movies whilst you enjoy good food in a fun environment!
Chain branch selling fair-trade coffee, tea, sandwiches and salads.
Insomnia Coffee Company
17 Farrell Street
Chain branch selling fair-trade coffee, tea, sandwiches and salads.
The Bookmarket Cafe serves great food, great coffee and homemade cakes, tarts and scones. Their sausage rolls are legendary! They also have a large selection of pre-loved books on sale for just €1, and host occasional music events.
The BOOK MARKet
11 Market St
The Bookmarket Cafe serves great food, great coffee and homemade cakes, tarts and scones. Their sausage rolls are legendary! They also have a large selection of pre-loved books on sale for just €1, and host occasional music events.
Since their first small market stall in Galway market Sheridan’s Cheesemongers have expanded their business to include a total of four retail outlets, six market stalls and a purpose built premises with warehouse, offices and maturing rooms in County Meath. It is on the site of the Old Virginia Road Railway Station from where they supply their many trade customers. Sheridan’s Cheesemongers provides the best of Irish Artisan food products but also the chance to discover other European cheese and wines. They have shops Dublin, Meath, Galway, and Ardkeen in County Waterford and market stalls in the greater Dublin area and Galway, as well as their warehouse shop in Kells, County Meath. Many of the best of Ireland’s retailers also stock Sheridans products so customers can find them throughout Ireland.
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Sheridan's Cheesemongers
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Since their first small market stall in Galway market Sheridan’s Cheesemongers have expanded their business to include a total of four retail outlets, six market stalls and a purpose built premises with warehouse, offices and maturing rooms in County Meath. It is on the site of the Old Virginia Road Railway Station from where they supply their many trade customers. Sheridan’s Cheesemongers provides the best of Irish Artisan food products but also the chance to discover other European cheese and wines. They have shops Dublin, Meath, Galway, and Ardkeen in County Waterford and market stalls in the greater Dublin area and Galway, as well as their warehouse shop in Kells, County Meath. Many of the best of Ireland’s retailers also stock Sheridans products so customers can find them throughout Ireland.
St Kyrans is located on the banks of Lough Ramor in Virgina, County Cavan. The restaurant is led by Northern born Conor MacCann who has brought his individual and distinctive style to the kitchen of St Kyrans. St Kyrans restaurant demonstrates a contemporary and modern style of cooking with a strong French influence. St Kyrans philosophy is to source the best ingredients that can be found locally and present them in a simple manner with a strong emphasis on flavour. Conor is committed to producing local, home-grown food with emphasis on natural flavours and presentation. His menu changes frequently depending on the season and what local suppliers deem to be in perfect condition. In 2013 St Kyrans Restaurant has received critical acclaim from Georgina Campbell and was nominated in the Irish Restaurant Awards. The Restaurant has also received a 2013 Certificate of Excellence from Trip Advisor and is recommended in the Michelin Guide for 2014. Meals are created with great care and attention to detail with locally sources food to ensure a high quality and enjoyable dining experiences.
St. Kyran's Restaurant
St Kyrans is located on the banks of Lough Ramor in Virgina, County Cavan. The restaurant is led by Northern born Conor MacCann who has brought his individual and distinctive style to the kitchen of St Kyrans. St Kyrans restaurant demonstrates a contemporary and modern style of cooking with a strong French influence. St Kyrans philosophy is to source the best ingredients that can be found locally and present them in a simple manner with a strong emphasis on flavour. Conor is committed to producing local, home-grown food with emphasis on natural flavours and presentation. His menu changes frequently depending on the season and what local suppliers deem to be in perfect condition. In 2013 St Kyrans Restaurant has received critical acclaim from Georgina Campbell and was nominated in the Irish Restaurant Awards. The Restaurant has also received a 2013 Certificate of Excellence from Trip Advisor and is recommended in the Michelin Guide for 2014. Meals are created with great care and attention to detail with locally sources food to ensure a high quality and enjoyable dining experiences.
Golf
Situated in the rich pastureland of north County Westmeath, Ballinlough Castle Golf Course is probably the most natural course you will play, with a mixture of sand and traditional greens meandering through 180 acres of mature parkland, with just a hint of water, that will prove to be a test for golfers of all levels.
Ballinlough Castle Golf Club
Situated in the rich pastureland of north County Westmeath, Ballinlough Castle Golf Course is probably the most natural course you will play, with a mixture of sand and traditional greens meandering through 180 acres of mature parkland, with just a hint of water, that will prove to be a test for golfers of all levels.
Headfort's Old Course established in 1928, the old course, formerly part of the Headfort Estate, was developed into an 18 hole course in 1956. Visitors from all over the world enjoy the experience of playing Headfort's old course. “This is potentially, the most attractive 36 hole parkland facility in the country,” according to Dermot Gilleece of the Sunday Independent. Headfort's New Course is also home to a magnificent Asiatic tree collection. Christy O’Connor Jnr, the designer of the new course, has made maximum use of the two islands on the Blackwater, the surrounding forests and the magnificent, mature, broadleaf trees dotted around the land. This course promises to be the jewel in the crown of Irish golfing circles. “It is the finest piece of land I have worked with and could host the Irish Open without any trouble,” according to Christy O’Connor Jr. The Sunday Independent's Dermot Gilleece wrote: “This is potentially the most attractive 36-hole parkland facility in the country.” Headfort is a 36 Hole complex comprising of Headfort Old Course and Headfort New Course.
Headfort Golf Club
Headfort's Old Course established in 1928, the old course, formerly part of the Headfort Estate, was developed into an 18 hole course in 1956. Visitors from all over the world enjoy the experience of playing Headfort's old course. “This is potentially, the most attractive 36 hole parkland facility in the country,” according to Dermot Gilleece of the Sunday Independent. Headfort's New Course is also home to a magnificent Asiatic tree collection. Christy O’Connor Jnr, the designer of the new course, has made maximum use of the two islands on the Blackwater, the surrounding forests and the magnificent, mature, broadleaf trees dotted around the land. This course promises to be the jewel in the crown of Irish golfing circles. “It is the finest piece of land I have worked with and could host the Irish Open without any trouble,” according to Christy O’Connor Jr. The Sunday Independent's Dermot Gilleece wrote: “This is potentially the most attractive 36-hole parkland facility in the country.” Headfort is a 36 Hole complex comprising of Headfort Old Course and Headfort New Course.
This nine-hole parkland course with narrow tree-lined fairways overlooks Lough Ramor. The golf course is on the grounds of the Park Hotel on the Virginia/Ballyjamesduff Road.
Virginia Golf Club
This nine-hole parkland course with narrow tree-lined fairways overlooks Lough Ramor. The golf course is on the grounds of the Park Hotel on the Virginia/Ballyjamesduff Road.