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Real, Amazing view from my Apartment

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Real, Amazing view from my Apartment

Gastronomic offer
My special gastronomic suggestions to make your trip to Rome unforgettable: restaurants, taverns, cafes, ice cream parlors. Roman cuisine is genuine, popular, simple but substantial, and has remained unchanged over the centuries. The tradition is rigatoni with pajata, (beef or veal entrails, cooked in a very tasty sauté) and bucatini all'amatriciana (tomato, bacon and pecorino), cacio and pepper, all high-calorie dishes par excellence, but it is worth making an exception to the diet. Do not miss the other great dishes of the Roman tradition, such as spaghetti alla carbonara or those with cacio e pepe. The Capitoline cuisine is not based only on the first courses: in one of the excellent trattorias in the city you can taste typical dishes such as the Roman lamb, the oxtail, the mixed fried meat, the "porchetta" from nearby Ariccia, accompanying them with the famous artichokes alla "giudia", chicory or "puntarelle". At breakfast, start the day with a nice "Maritozzo" with cream!
Historic tavern since 1961 a stone's throw from the wonderful Pantheon. the specialties are those typical of Rome, with a sensitivity to the quality of raw materials. Alongside the "Bollitto alla Picchiapò", the Artichoke alla Romana, the Baccalà and, of course, the Carbonara, Cacio e Pepe and Amatriciana, one of the dishes to taste is the Armando-style meatballs, which are indeed a dish of the Capitoline tradition.
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Armando al Pantheon
31 Salita dei Crescenzi
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Historic tavern since 1961 a stone's throw from the wonderful Pantheon. the specialties are those typical of Rome, with a sensitivity to the quality of raw materials. Alongside the "Bollitto alla Picchiapò", the Artichoke alla Romana, the Baccalà and, of course, the Carbonara, Cacio e Pepe and Amatriciana, one of the dishes to taste is the Armando-style meatballs, which are indeed a dish of the Capitoline tradition.
Roscioli offers pure, intense Roman and local cuisine based on the product and excellent raw materials. Each ingredient comes from local realities, from small and medium-sized producers capable of creating unique raw materials and products. The restaurant, in via dei Giubbonari 21, is open for both lunch and dinner only with telephone reservations at +39 o6 6875287.
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Roscioli Salumeria con Cucina
21/22 Via dei Giubbonari
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Roscioli offers pure, intense Roman and local cuisine based on the product and excellent raw materials. Each ingredient comes from local realities, from small and medium-sized producers capable of creating unique raw materials and products. The restaurant, in via dei Giubbonari 21, is open for both lunch and dinner only with telephone reservations at +39 o6 6875287.
If you are near the famous "Campo dei Fiori" and "Piazza Navona", I recommend a gastronomic stop at "Hosteria Grappolo d'Oro" (piazza della Cancelleria, 80), a fort of taste that interprets Roman cuisine between tradition and modernity. with traditional recipes and cooking, seasonal products from small local businesses.
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Hosteria Grappolo d'oro
80 Piazza della Cancelleria
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If you are near the famous "Campo dei Fiori" and "Piazza Navona", I recommend a gastronomic stop at "Hosteria Grappolo d'Oro" (piazza della Cancelleria, 80), a fort of taste that interprets Roman cuisine between tradition and modernity. with traditional recipes and cooking, seasonal products from small local businesses.
The Restaurant Urbana 47, near the apartment (10 minutes by walking) is in the most cool neighborhood of Rome: Monti!
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Urbana 47
47 Via Urbana
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The Restaurant Urbana 47, near the apartment (10 minutes by walking) is in the most cool neighborhood of Rome: Monti!
Traditional Roman cuisine in the charming Jewish quarter of ancient Rome. I recommend booking an outdoor table with a romantic view of the ancient Theater of Marcellus (small Colosseum).
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Giggetto
21/a Via del Portico d'Ottavia
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Traditional Roman cuisine in the charming Jewish quarter of ancient Rome. I recommend booking an outdoor table with a romantic view of the ancient Theater of Marcellus (small Colosseum).
Since 1936 Felice a Testaccio has been an institution of Roman cuisine. The restaurant born in Testaccio, a Roman neighborhood that takes its name from the mound formed by debris and shards –heads-, is now part of the excellence of Italian food. OPEN EVERY DAY Lunch 12.30 - 15.30 | Dinner 7.30pm - 11.30pm Reservations are accepted only by telephone by calling +39 06.5746800 from Monday to Saturday from 10.00 to 19.00
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Felice a Testaccio
29 Via Mastro Giorgio
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Since 1936 Felice a Testaccio has been an institution of Roman cuisine. The restaurant born in Testaccio, a Roman neighborhood that takes its name from the mound formed by debris and shards –heads-, is now part of the excellence of Italian food. OPEN EVERY DAY Lunch 12.30 - 15.30 | Dinner 7.30pm - 11.30pm Reservations are accepted only by telephone by calling +39 06.5746800 from Monday to Saturday from 10.00 to 19.00
If you want a fish restaurant, in the historic and fascinating Trastevere district, I recommend "Osteria La Gensola". Among the dishes, we highlight the tuna tartare with horseradish sauce (19 euros), egg noodles with squid and dried tomatoes, Campo Filone macaroni with raw red prawns ragout (20). There are also typical dishes such as rigatoni alla carbonara (13). Among the main courses, apart from the tripe (15), here is the grilled swordfish with “ammogghiu” (18 euros), the swordfish meatballs with fresh tomatoes and grilled scampi (30). Among the desserts, the Sicilian cassata. + 39 06 5816312 Piazza della Gensola, 15
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Osteria La Gensola
15 Piazza della Gensola
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If you want a fish restaurant, in the historic and fascinating Trastevere district, I recommend "Osteria La Gensola". Among the dishes, we highlight the tuna tartare with horseradish sauce (19 euros), egg noodles with squid and dried tomatoes, Campo Filone macaroni with raw red prawns ragout (20). There are also typical dishes such as rigatoni alla carbonara (13). Among the main courses, apart from the tripe (15), here is the grilled swordfish with “ammogghiu” (18 euros), the swordfish meatballs with fresh tomatoes and grilled scampi (30). Among the desserts, the Sicilian cassata. + 39 06 5816312 Piazza della Gensola, 15
Historic and small trattoria in the famous "Trastevere" district with typical dishes of the Roman tradition to eat in an informal osteria in Rome.
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Trattoria Da Enzo al 29
29 Via dei Vascellari
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Historic and small trattoria in the famous "Trastevere" district with typical dishes of the Roman tradition to eat in an informal osteria in Rome.
The restaurant takes its name from its vicinity to Rome’s parliamentary building. This means that Gino al Parlamento lies somewhere between the Pantheon and Piazza del Popolo just off Via del Corso (one of Rome’s main shopping streets). Small tavern where you can eat the historic dishes of typical Roman cuisine at affordable prices in an environment, even if decidedly kitsch, welcoming and informal Vicolo Rosini, 4 Phone: +39 06 6873434
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Da Gino al Parlamento
4 Vicolo Rosini
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The restaurant takes its name from its vicinity to Rome’s parliamentary building. This means that Gino al Parlamento lies somewhere between the Pantheon and Piazza del Popolo just off Via del Corso (one of Rome’s main shopping streets). Small tavern where you can eat the historic dishes of typical Roman cuisine at affordable prices in an environment, even if decidedly kitsch, welcoming and informal Vicolo Rosini, 4 Phone: +39 06 6873434
Special Cafeteria and Restaurant for an unforgettable breakfast or lunch inside the historic French Academy. I recommend booking a table with one of the most beautiful views of Ancient Rome and visiting the palace and the wonderful gardens of Villa Medici.
Colbert Ristorante Caffetteria
1 Viale della Trinità dei Monti
Special Cafeteria and Restaurant for an unforgettable breakfast or lunch inside the historic French Academy. I recommend booking a table with one of the most beautiful views of Ancient Rome and visiting the palace and the wonderful gardens of Villa Medici.
For a romantic aperitif I recommend the terrace of the Hotel Forum, a few steps from the apartment with an unforgettable view of the Imperial Forums.
Ristorante Panoramico Forum Roof Garden
25-30 Via Tor de' Conti
For a romantic aperitif I recommend the terrace of the Hotel Forum, a few steps from the apartment with an unforgettable view of the Imperial Forums.
For an unforgettable breakfast or lunch overlooking ancient Rome and the Tiber river, a few steps from the apartment, I highly recommend the Caffarelli Terrace, the cafeteria of the Capitoline Museums.
Caffè Capitolino
4 Piazzale Caffarelli
For an unforgettable breakfast or lunch overlooking ancient Rome and the Tiber river, a few steps from the apartment, I highly recommend the Caffarelli Terrace, the cafeteria of the Capitoline Museums.
While shopping in the historic center in the commercial via del Corso, the elegant and expensive via Condotti, you can rest in the historic Babington's tea room, established in 1893. It is a traditional English tea shop at the foot of the Spanish Steps in the Piazza di Spagna in Rome, Italy. History. The tea room itself was founded by two young English ladies who arrived in Rome in 1893. They were Isabel Cargill, daughter of Captain Cargill, founder of the city of Dunedin in New Zealand and Anna Maria Babington, descendant of Antony Babington who was hanged in 1586 for conspiring against Elizabeth I.
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Babington's tea room
23 Piazza di Spagna
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While shopping in the historic center in the commercial via del Corso, the elegant and expensive via Condotti, you can rest in the historic Babington's tea room, established in 1893. It is a traditional English tea shop at the foot of the Spanish Steps in the Piazza di Spagna in Rome, Italy. History. The tea room itself was founded by two young English ladies who arrived in Rome in 1893. They were Isabel Cargill, daughter of Captain Cargill, founder of the city of Dunedin in New Zealand and Anna Maria Babington, descendant of Antony Babington who was hanged in 1586 for conspiring against Elizabeth I. 
If you go to visit the Pantheon, you must stop for an ice cream. The empire of meringue (present in hazelnut, caramel and chocolate flavors), is located in a delightful square in front of the Rococo church of Santa Maria Maddalena, a stone's throw from the Pantheon. The basic cornerstones are the great attention to the raw material and the re-education to the taste of the genuine. Creams have a clear advantage over fruit, both numerically and in terms of fame; I therefore mention caramel meringue, special with its music of "crunches" of grains, dark brown (chocolate sorbet), surprisingly creamy despite the absence of milk and last but not least the wild orange sorbet, with a particular flavor but pleasant and fresh. The prices are a bit high but justified by the quality of the raw materials.
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Il Gelato di San Crispino
3 Piazza della Maddalena
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If you go to visit the Pantheon, you must stop for an ice cream. The empire of meringue (present in hazelnut, caramel and chocolate flavors), is located in a delightful square in front of the Rococo church of Santa Maria Maddalena, a stone's throw from the Pantheon. The basic cornerstones are the great attention to the raw material and the re-education to the taste of the genuine. Creams have a clear advantage over fruit, both numerically and in terms of fame; I therefore mention caramel meringue, special with its music of "crunches" of grains, dark brown (chocolate sorbet), surprisingly creamy despite the absence of milk and last but not least the wild orange sorbet, with a particular flavor but pleasant and fresh. The prices are a bit high but justified by the quality of the raw materials.
If you visit "Piazza Navona", I recommend an ice cream parlor in one of the most fascinating streets of the historic center, full of antique dealers and craft shops. This oasis of taste appears in an alley in via dei Coronari, an ideal destination for those who appreciate elaborate tastes and eccentric flavors. A grocery store, a laboratory (on sight) of blends where perhaps you will be hesitant to come across pumpkin and amaretto, pear and ginger, sacher cake, sage and raspberry or rosemary, honey and lemon. There are also more classic flavors such as hazelnut, Bronte pistachio and Avola almond. Let yourself be conquered by the spicy flavors, the texture is superfine and the taste involves mind and body. Recommended flavor: Nero d'Avola chocolate Gelateria del Teatro, via di San Simone 70. Tel. 06.45474880
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Gelateria del Teatro
65/66 Via dei Coronari
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If you visit "Piazza Navona", I recommend an ice cream parlor in one of the most fascinating streets of the historic center, full of antique dealers and craft shops. This oasis of taste appears in an alley in via dei Coronari, an ideal destination for those who appreciate elaborate tastes and eccentric flavors. A grocery store, a laboratory (on sight) of blends where perhaps you will be hesitant to come across pumpkin and amaretto, pear and ginger, sacher cake, sage and raspberry or rosemary, honey and lemon. There are also more classic flavors such as hazelnut, Bronte pistachio and Avola almond. Let yourself be conquered by the spicy flavors, the texture is superfine and the taste involves mind and body. Recommended flavor: Nero d'Avola chocolate Gelateria del Teatro, via di San Simone 70. Tel. 06.45474880
Monuments not to be missed
The Colosseum, originally known as Amphitheatrum Flavium (in Italian: Flavian Amphitheater) or simply as Amphitheatrum, located in the center of the city of Rome, is the largest amphitheater in the world. Able to hold an estimated number of spectators between 50,000 and 87,000, it is the most important Roman amphitheater, as well as the most imposing monument of ancient Rome that has come down to us. [1], known throughout the world as symbol of the city of Rome and one of the symbols of Italy.
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Colosseum
1 Piazza del Colosseo
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The Colosseum, originally known as Amphitheatrum Flavium (in Italian: Flavian Amphitheater) or simply as Amphitheatrum, located in the center of the city of Rome, is the largest amphitheater in the world. Able to hold an estimated number of spectators between 50,000 and 87,000, it is the most important Roman amphitheater, as well as the most imposing monument of ancient Rome that has come down to us. [1], known throughout the world as symbol of the city of Rome and one of the symbols of Italy.
The Sistine Chapel (Latin: Sacellum Sixtinum), dedicated to Maria Assunta in Cielo, is the main chapel of the apostolic palace, as well as one of the most famous cultural and artistic treasures of the Vatican City, included in the itinerary of the Vatican Museums. It was built between 1475 and 1481, at the time of Pope Sixtus IV della Rovere, from whom it took its name. It is known throughout the world both for being the place where the conclave and other official ceremonies of the pope are held (in the past also some papal coronations), and for being decorated with works of art among the most known and celebrated of civilization Western art, among which stand out the famous frescoes by Michelangelo, which cover the vault (about 1508-1512) and the back wall (of the Last Judgment) above the altar (about 1535-1541).
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Sixtinska kapellet
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The Sistine Chapel (Latin: Sacellum Sixtinum), dedicated to Maria Assunta in Cielo, is the main chapel of the apostolic palace, as well as one of the most famous cultural and artistic treasures of the Vatican City, included in the itinerary of the Vatican Museums. It was built between 1475 and 1481, at the time of Pope Sixtus IV della Rovere, from whom it took its name. It is known throughout the world both for being the place where the conclave and other official ceremonies of the pope are held (in the past also some papal coronations), and for being decorated with works of art among the most known and celebrated of civilization Western art, among which stand out the famous frescoes by Michelangelo, which cover the vault (about 1508-1512) and the back wall (of the Last Judgment) above the altar (about 1535-1541).
The Domus Aurea ("Golden House" in Latin, precisely because a lot of this precious metal was used in it) was the urban villa built by the Roman emperor Nero after the great fire that devastated Rome in 64 AD. The destruction of a large part of the urban center allowed the princeps to expropriate a total area of ​​about 80 hectares and build a palace that stretched between the Palatine, the Esquiline and the Celio. The villa, probably never completed, was destroyed after Nero's death following the restitution of the land on which it stood to the Roman people. The surviving part of the Domus Aurea, hidden by the successive baths of Trajan, like the whole historic center of Rome, the extraterritorial areas of the Holy See in Italy and the basilica of San Paolo fuori le mura, has been included in the list of World Heritage Sites. by UNESCO in 1980.
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Domus Aurea
1 Via della Domus Aurea
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The Domus Aurea ("Golden House" in Latin, precisely because a lot of this precious metal was used in it) was the urban villa built by the Roman emperor Nero after the great fire that devastated Rome in 64 AD. The destruction of a large part of the urban center allowed the princeps to expropriate a total area of ​​about 80 hectares and build a palace that stretched between the Palatine, the Esquiline and the Celio. The villa, probably never completed, was destroyed after Nero's death following the restitution of the land on which it stood to the Roman people. The surviving part of the Domus Aurea, hidden by the successive baths of Trajan, like the whole historic center of Rome, the extraterritorial areas of the Holy See in Italy and the basilica of San Paolo fuori le mura, has been included in the list of World Heritage Sites. by UNESCO in 1980.
The Trevi Fountain is a fountain in the Trevi district, designed by Italian architect Nicola Salvi and completed by Giuseppe Pannini and several others. Standing 26.3 metres (86 ft) high and 49.15 metres (161.3 ft) wide, it is the largest baroque fountain in the city and one of the most famous fountains in the world. The fountain has appeared in several notable films, including Roman Holiday (1953), the eponymous Three Coins in the Fountain (1954), Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita (1960), and The Lizzie McGuire Movie (2003).
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Trevi Fountain
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The Trevi Fountain is a fountain in the Trevi district, designed by Italian architect Nicola Salvi and completed by Giuseppe Pannini and several others. Standing 26.3 metres (86 ft) high and 49.15 metres (161.3 ft) wide, it is the largest baroque fountain in the city and one of the most famous fountains in the world. The fountain has appeared in several notable films, including Roman Holiday (1953), the eponymous Three Coins in the Fountain (1954), Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita (1960), and The Lizzie McGuire Movie (2003).
The Palatine Hill, one of the 7 hills of Rome, according to mythology is the very place where the city was founded by Romulus and Remus. As you may know, they are the twins who were found and nursed by a she-wolf inside a cave. At the top of the Palatine Hill, you will have access to this cave and the ruins of the residences of historical figures such as Augustus, the first emperor of Rome. The visit of the Palatine Hill is included in the entrance ticket to the Colosseum.
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Palatine Hill
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The Palatine Hill, one of the 7 hills of Rome, according to mythology is the very place where the city was founded by Romulus and Remus. As you may know, they are the twins who were found and nursed by a she-wolf inside a cave. At the top of the Palatine Hill, you will have access to this cave and the ruins of the residences of historical figures such as Augustus, the first emperor of Rome. The visit of the Palatine Hill is included in the entrance ticket to the Colosseum.
The Capitolium or Capitoline Hill, between the Roman Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the Seven Hills of Rome and seat of the mayor of Rome. Here stands one of the most important monuments of the city, the Tabularium, even if in ancient times the entrance was from the side of the Roman Forum. By the 16th century, Capitolinus had become Capitolino in Italian, and Capitolium Campidoglio. The Capitoline Hill contains few ancient ground-level ruins, as they are almost entirely covered up by Medieval and Renaissance palazzi (now housing the Capitoline Museums) that surround a piazza, a significant urban plan designed by Michelangelo. The large staircase designed by Michelangelo but built by Giacomo Della Porta that allows access to the square, the so-called "Cordonata", has a pair of Egyptian lions at the base. Arriving at the square we find ourselves in front of the Palazzo Senatorio, on the left the Palazzo Nuovo and on the right the Palazzo dei Conservatori, while in the center of the square stands the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, built in 176 AD.
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Campidoglio
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The Capitolium or Capitoline Hill, between the Roman Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the Seven Hills of Rome and seat of the mayor of Rome. Here stands one of the most important monuments of the city, the Tabularium, even if in ancient times the entrance was from the side of the Roman Forum. By the 16th century, Capitolinus had become Capitolino in Italian, and Capitolium Campidoglio. The Capitoline Hill contains few ancient ground-level ruins, as they are almost entirely covered up by Medieval and Renaissance palazzi (now housing the Capitoline Museums) that surround a piazza, a significant urban plan designed by Michelangelo. The large staircase designed by Michelangelo but built by Giacomo Della Porta that allows access to the square, the so-called "Cordonata", has a pair of Egyptian lions at the base. Arriving at the square we find ourselves in front of the Palazzo Senatorio, on the left the Palazzo Nuovo and on the right the Palazzo dei Conservatori, while in the center of the square stands the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, built in 176 AD.
The Pantheon is a former Roman temple, now a Catholic church (Basilica di Santa Maria ad Martyres), on the site of an earlier temple commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus (27 BC – 14 AD). It was rebuilt by the emperor Hadrian and probably dedicated about 126 AD. The building is cylindrical with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43 metres (142 ft). Since the Renaissance the Pantheon has been the site of several important burials. Among those buried there are the painters Raphael and Annibale Carracci, the composer Arcangelo Corelli, and the architect Baldassare Peruzzi. In the 15th century, the Pantheon was adorned with paintings: the best-known is the Annunciation by Melozzo da Forlì. Filippo Brunelleschi, among other architects, looked to the Pantheon as inspiration for their works.
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Pantheon
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The Pantheon is a former Roman temple, now a Catholic church (Basilica di Santa Maria ad Martyres), on the site of an earlier temple commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus (27 BC – 14 AD). It was rebuilt by the emperor Hadrian and probably dedicated about 126 AD. The building is cylindrical with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43 metres (142 ft). Since the Renaissance the Pantheon has been the site of several important burials. Among those buried there are the painters Raphael and Annibale Carracci, the composer Arcangelo Corelli, and the architect Baldassare Peruzzi. In the 15th century, the Pantheon was adorned with paintings: the best-known is the Annunciation by Melozzo da Forlì. Filippo Brunelleschi, among other architects, looked to the Pantheon as inspiration for their works.
The Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as Castel Sant'Angelo (English: Castle of the Holy Angel), is a towering cylindrical building in Parco Adriano. It was initially commissioned by the Roman Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum for himself and his family. The building was later used by the popes as a fortress and castle, and is now a museum.  A stone's throw from St. Peter's Square, it is connected to the Vatican State through the fortified corridor of the "passetto". The castle has been radically modified several times in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.
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Castel Sant'Angelo
50 Lungotevere Castello
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The Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as Castel Sant'Angelo (English: Castle of the Holy Angel), is a towering cylindrical building in Parco Adriano. It was initially commissioned by the Roman Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum for himself and his family. The building was later used by the popes as a fortress and castle, and is now a museum.  A stone's throw from St. Peter's Square, it is connected to the Vatican State through the fortified corridor of the "passetto". The castle has been radically modified several times in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.
Parks and Villas in the city
Rome is the greenest city in Europe and there are many parks even in the historic center that you cannot miss.
The French Academy in Rome is a French artistic institution located in Rome in Villa Medici, on the Pincio hill, which welcomes artists and researchers into residence to allow them to carry out their research projects. The Accademia di Francia in Rome also offers a rich cultural program, organizing exhibitions, concerts, screenings, literary meetings and conferences, often in collaboration with fellows or former fellows. It also takes care of preserving and making Villa Medici and its gardens known, open to the public every day (except Mondays) through guided tours.
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Villa Medici
1 Viale della Trinità dei Monti
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The French Academy in Rome is a French artistic institution located in Rome in Villa Medici, on the Pincio hill, which welcomes artists and researchers into residence to allow them to carry out their research projects. The Accademia di Francia in Rome also offers a rich cultural program, organizing exhibitions, concerts, screenings, literary meetings and conferences, often in collaboration with fellows or former fellows. It also takes care of preserving and making Villa Medici and its gardens known, open to the public every day (except Mondays) through guided tours.
North of Piazza di Spagna, there is the largest and certainly the most beautiful public park in all of Rome. The gardens of Villa Borghese offer a bit of calm and a moment of welcome peace after the crowds on the street and at the tourist attractions! You can stroll through its wide shaded alleys and on the shore of a lake surrounded by temples, statues and many fountains. The park also has a splendid botanical garden. To get there, go to Porta Pinciana or Piazzale Flaminio, the 2 entrances to the park. Inside Villa Borghese there is the wonderful Museum "la Galleria Borghese" which you absolutely cannot miss.
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Villa Borghese
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North of Piazza di Spagna, there is the largest and certainly the most beautiful public park in all of Rome. The gardens of Villa Borghese offer a bit of calm and a moment of welcome peace after the crowds on the street and at the tourist attractions! You can stroll through its wide shaded alleys and on the shore of a lake surrounded by temples, statues and many fountains. The park also has a splendid botanical garden. To get there, go to Porta Pinciana or Piazzale Flaminio, the 2 entrances to the park. Inside Villa Borghese there is the wonderful Museum "la Galleria Borghese" which you absolutely cannot miss.
If you go to visit the Colosseum, do not take a relaxing walk to "Villa Celimontana", a public park whose creation dates back to the sixteenth century. It was subject to transformation in a landscape sense in 1858 by the French architect Pierre Charles L'Enfant (1754-1825) on the initiative of Laura Maria Giuseppa di Bauffremont and again in 1870, with neo-Gothic style interventions, for the last owner Richard von Hoffmann. The villa covers a site from the Flavian and Traianean ages of which there are walls. It contains numerous finds from various eras and origins, including the Egyptian obelisk of Ramses II. Archaeological excavations brought to light in 1889 the Basilica Hilariana and its unique mosaics.
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Villa Celimontana
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If you go to visit the Colosseum, do not take a relaxing walk to "Villa Celimontana", a public park whose creation dates back to the sixteenth century. It was subject to transformation in a landscape sense in 1858 by the French architect Pierre Charles L'Enfant (1754-1825) on the initiative of Laura Maria Giuseppa di Bauffremont and again in 1870, with neo-Gothic style interventions, for the last owner Richard von Hoffmann. The villa covers a site from the Flavian and Traianean ages of which there are walls. It contains numerous finds from various eras and origins, including the Egyptian obelisk of Ramses II. Archaeological excavations brought to light in 1889 the Basilica Hilariana and its unique mosaics.
The Circus Maximus is an ancient Roman chariot-racing stadium and mass entertainment venue in Rome. In the gap between the Aventine and Palatine hills, it was the first and largest stadium in ancient Rome and its later Empire. It measured 621 m (2,037 ft) in length and 118 m (387 ft) in width and could accommodate over 150,000 spectators. In its fully developed form, it became the model for circuses throughout the Roman Empire. The site is now a public park.
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Circus Maximus
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The Circus Maximus is an ancient Roman chariot-racing stadium and mass entertainment venue in Rome. In the gap between the Aventine and Palatine hills, it was the first and largest stadium in ancient Rome and its later Empire. It measured 621 m (2,037 ft) in length and 118 m (387 ft) in width and could accommodate over 150,000 spectators. In its fully developed form, it became the model for circuses throughout the Roman Empire. The site is now a public park.
The Orange Trees Garden (Italian: Giardino degli aranci) is the name used in Rome to describe the Parco Savello. It is about 7,800 square meters and is located on the Aventine Hill. The park offers an excellent view of the city. The garden, as it is today, was designed in 1932 by Raffaele De Vico. It was constructed to offer public access to the view from the side of the hill, creating a new ‘’belvedere’’, to be added to the existing viewpoints in Rome from the Pincian Hill and the Janiculum. The garden, whose name comes from the many bitter orange trees growing there, extends over the area of an ancient fortress built near the basilica of Santa Sabina by the Savelli family between 1285 and 1287, which, in turn, was built over an old castle constructed by the Crescentii in the tenth century. A few steps from the Orange Garden, you will find a great surprise. From the keyhole of a historic building, you will be able to see the dome of St. Peter. The gate from which you can enjoy this view is inserted in the structure of the villa of the Priorato di Malta which overlooks the Piazza dei Cavalieri di Malta. The villa stands on the area that was a Benedictine monastery founded in 939 which passed to the Templars in the twelfth century but was stolen by Clement V and finally seized it in 1400 by Pope Paul II who granted it to the Sovereign Military Order of Malta.
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Giardino degli Aranci
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The Orange Trees Garden (Italian: Giardino degli aranci) is the name used in Rome to describe the Parco Savello. It is about 7,800 square meters and is located on the Aventine Hill. The park offers an excellent view of the city. The garden, as it is today, was designed in 1932 by Raffaele De Vico. It was constructed to offer public access to the view from the side of the hill, creating a new ‘’belvedere’’, to be added to the existing viewpoints in Rome from the Pincian Hill and the Janiculum. The garden, whose name comes from the many bitter orange trees growing there, extends over the area of an ancient fortress built near the basilica of Santa Sabina by the Savelli family between 1285 and 1287, which, in turn, was built over an old castle constructed by the Crescentii in the tenth century. A few steps from the Orange Garden, you will find a great surprise. From the keyhole of a historic building, you will be able to see the dome of St. Peter. The gate from which you can enjoy this view is inserted in the structure of the villa of the Priorato di Malta which overlooks the Piazza dei Cavalieri di Malta. The villa stands on the area that was a Benedictine monastery founded in 939 which passed to the Templars in the twelfth century but was stolen by Clement V and finally seized it in 1400 by Pope Paul II who granted it to the Sovereign Military Order of Malta.
MUSEUMS
The Capitoline Museums are the main municipal civic museum in Rome, with an exhibition area of ​​12,977 m². Opened to the public in 1734, under Pope Clement XII, they are considered the first museum in the world, intended as a place where art could be enjoyed by everyone and not just by the owners. We speak of "museums", in the plural, as the original collection of ancient sculptures was added by Pope Benedict XIV, in the 18th century, to the Pinacoteca, consisting of works illustrating mainly Roman subjects.
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Kapitolinska Museerna
1 Piazza del Campidoglio
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The Capitoline Museums are the main municipal civic museum in Rome, with an exhibition area of ​​12,977 m². Opened to the public in 1734, under Pope Clement XII, they are considered the first museum in the world, intended as a place where art could be enjoyed by everyone and not just by the owners. We speak of "museums", in the plural, as the original collection of ancient sculptures was added by Pope Benedict XIV, in the 18th century, to the Pinacoteca, consisting of works illustrating mainly Roman subjects.
The Borghese gallery is located in piazzale del Museo Borghese 5, inside the Villa Borghese Pinciana in Rome in Italy. The museum exhibits works by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Agnolo Bronzino, Antonio Canova, Caravaggio, Raphael, Perugino, Lorenzo Lotto, Antonello da Messina, Cranach, Annibale Carracci, Pieter Paul Rubens, Bellini, Tiziano. It can be considered unique in the world as regards the number and importance of Bernini's sculptures and Caravaggio's paintings.
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Galleria Borghese
5 Piazzale Scipione Borghese
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The Borghese gallery is located in piazzale del Museo Borghese 5, inside the Villa Borghese Pinciana in Rome in Italy. The museum exhibits works by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Agnolo Bronzino, Antonio Canova, Caravaggio, Raphael, Perugino, Lorenzo Lotto, Antonello da Messina, Cranach, Annibale Carracci, Pieter Paul Rubens, Bellini, Tiziano. It can be considered unique in the world as regards the number and importance of Bernini's sculptures and Caravaggio's paintings.
MAXXI - National Museum of XXI Century Arts is the Museum of Contemporary Art in Rome. Designed by the famous architect Zaha Hadid, it is divided into two sections: MAXXI art and MAXXI architecture.
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MAXXI
4A Via Guido Reni
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MAXXI - National Museum of XXI Century Arts is the Museum of Contemporary Art in Rome. Designed by the famous architect Zaha Hadid, it is divided into two sections: MAXXI art and MAXXI architecture.
The Ara Pacis Augustae (Augustus Altar of Peace) is an altar built by Augustus in 9 BC. to Peace in the sense of divinity. Originally located in an area of ​​the Campus Martius consecrated to the celebration of victories, the place was emblematic because it is located one Roman mile (1,472 m) from the pomerium, the limit of the city where the consul returning from a military expedition lost the relative powers ( imperium militiae) and regained possession of its civil powers (imperium domi). This monument represents one of the most significant surviving testimonies of Augustan art and is intended to symbolize the peace and prosperity achieved as a result of the Pax Romana.
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Museo dell'Ara Pacis
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The Ara Pacis Augustae (Augustus Altar of Peace) is an altar built by Augustus in 9 BC. to Peace in the sense of divinity. Originally located in an area of ​​the Campus Martius consecrated to the celebration of victories, the place was emblematic because it is located one Roman mile (1,472 m) from the pomerium, the limit of the city where the consul returning from a military expedition lost the relative powers ( imperium militiae) and regained possession of its civil powers (imperium domi). This monument represents one of the most significant surviving testimonies of Augustan art and is intended to symbolize the peace and prosperity achieved as a result of the Pax Romana.
The Vatican Museums are the museum center of the Vatican City. Founded by Pope Julius II in the 16th century, they occupy a large part of the vast courtyard of the Belvedere and are one of the largest art collections in the world, since they exhibit the enormous collection of works of art accumulated over the centuries by the popes: the Sistine Chapel and the papal apartments frescoed by Michelangelo and Raphael are part of the works that visitors can admire on their way. Although the museums are located entirely in Vatican territory, their entrance is in Italian territory, in viale Vaticano 6 in Rome.
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Vatikanmuseerna
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The Vatican Museums are the museum center of the Vatican City. Founded by Pope Julius II in the 16th century, they occupy a large part of the vast courtyard of the Belvedere and are one of the largest art collections in the world, since they exhibit the enormous collection of works of art accumulated over the centuries by the popes: the Sistine Chapel and the papal apartments frescoed by Michelangelo and Raphael are part of the works that visitors can admire on their way. Although the museums are located entirely in Vatican territory, their entrance is in Italian territory, in viale Vaticano 6 in Rome.
The Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna e Contemporanea ("national gallery of modern and contemporary art") was founded in 1883 and is dedicated to modern and contemporary art. The museum displays about 1100 paintings and sculptures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, of which it has the largest collection in Italy. Among the Italian artists represented are Giacomo Balla, Umberto Boccioni, Alberto Burri, Antonio Canova, Giorgio de Chirico, Lucio Fontana, Amedeo Modigliani, Giacomo Manzù, Vittorio Matteo Corcos, and Giorgio Morandi. The museum also holds some works by foreign artists, among them Braque, Calder, Cézanne, Degas, Duchamp, Giacometti, Kandinsky, Mondrian, Monet, Jackson Pollock, Rodin, and Van Gogh.[6] The Museo Boncompagni Ludovisi per le arti decorative, the Museo Hendrik C. Andersen, the Raccoltà Manzù, and the Museo Mario Praz form part of the Galleria Nazionale. The present building, the Palazzo delle Belle Arti (Palace of Fine Arts) at Via delle Belle Arti, 113 (near the Etruscan Museum) was designed by prominent Italian architect Cesare Bazzani. It was completed between 1911 and 1915. The facade features exterior architectural friezes by sculptors Ermenegildo Luppi, Adolfo Laurenti, and Giovanni Prini, with four figures of Fame holding bronze wreaths, sculpted by Adolfo Pantaresi and Albino Candoni.
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Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna
131 Viale delle Belle Arti
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The Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna e Contemporanea ("national gallery of modern and contemporary art") was founded in 1883 and is dedicated to modern and contemporary art. The museum displays about 1100 paintings and sculptures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, of which it has the largest collection in Italy. Among the Italian artists represented are Giacomo Balla, Umberto Boccioni, Alberto Burri, Antonio Canova, Giorgio de Chirico, Lucio Fontana, Amedeo Modigliani, Giacomo Manzù, Vittorio Matteo Corcos, and Giorgio Morandi. The museum also holds some works by foreign artists, among them Braque, Calder, Cézanne, Degas, Duchamp, Giacometti, Kandinsky, Mondrian, Monet, Jackson Pollock, Rodin, and Van Gogh.[6] The Museo Boncompagni Ludovisi per le arti decorative, the Museo Hendrik C. Andersen, the Raccoltà Manzù, and the Museo Mario Praz form part of the Galleria Nazionale. The present building, the Palazzo delle Belle Arti (Palace of Fine Arts) at Via delle Belle Arti, 113 (near the Etruscan Museum) was designed by prominent Italian architect Cesare Bazzani. It was completed between 1911 and 1915. The facade features exterior architectural friezes by sculptors Ermenegildo Luppi, Adolfo Laurenti, and Giovanni Prini, with four figures of Fame holding bronze wreaths, sculpted by Adolfo Pantaresi and Albino Candoni.
The Palazzo Barberini (English: Barberini Palace) is a 17th-century palace in Rome, facing the Piazza Barberini in Rione Trevi. Today it houses the Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica, the main national collection of older paintings in Rome. It includes Raphael's portrait La fornarina, Caravaggio's Judith Beheading Holofernes and a Hans Holbein portrait of Henry VIII. The salon ceiling is graced by Pietro da Cortona's masterpiece, the Baroque fresco of the Allegory of Divine Providence and Barberini Power.  Three great architects worked to create the Palazzo, each contributing his own style and character to the building. Carlo Maderno, then at work extending the nave of St Peter's, was commissioned to enclose the Villa Sforza within a vast Renaissance block along the lines of Palazzo Farnese; however, the design quickly evolved into a precedent-setting combination of an urban seat of princely power combined with a garden front that had the nature of a suburban villa with a semi-enclosed garden. Maderno began in 1627, assisted by his nephew Francesco Borromini. When Maderno died in 1629, Borromini was passed over and the commission was awarded to Bernini, a young prodigy then better known as a sculptor. Borromini stayed on regardless and the two architects worked together, albeit briefly, on this project and at the Palazzo Spada. Works were completed by Bernini in 1633.
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Palazzo Barberini
13 Via delle Quattro Fontane
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The Palazzo Barberini (English: Barberini Palace) is a 17th-century palace in Rome, facing the Piazza Barberini in Rione Trevi. Today it houses the Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica, the main national collection of older paintings in Rome. It includes Raphael's portrait La fornarina, Caravaggio's Judith Beheading Holofernes and a Hans Holbein portrait of Henry VIII. The salon ceiling is graced by Pietro da Cortona's masterpiece, the Baroque fresco of the Allegory of Divine Providence and Barberini Power.  Three great architects worked to create the Palazzo, each contributing his own style and character to the building. Carlo Maderno, then at work extending the nave of St Peter's, was commissioned to enclose the Villa Sforza within a vast Renaissance block along the lines of Palazzo Farnese; however, the design quickly evolved into a precedent-setting combination of an urban seat of princely power combined with a garden front that had the nature of a suburban villa with a semi-enclosed garden. Maderno began in 1627, assisted by his nephew Francesco Borromini. When Maderno died in 1629, Borromini was passed over and the commission was awarded to Bernini, a young prodigy then better known as a sculptor. Borromini stayed on regardless and the two architects worked together, albeit briefly, on this project and at the Palazzo Spada. Works were completed by Bernini in 1633.
The National Etruscan Museum (Italian: Museo Nazionale Etrusco) is a museum of the Etruscan civilization, housed in the Villa Giulia in Rome. The villa was built for Pope Julius III, for whom it was named. It remained in papal property until 1870, when, in the wake of the Risorgimento and the demise of the Papal States, it became the property of the Kingdom of Italy. The museum was founded in 1889 as part of the same nationalistic movement, with the aim of collecting together all the pre-Roman antiquities of Latium, southern Etruria and Umbria belonging to the Etruscan and Faliscan civilizations, and has been housed in the villa since the beginning of the 20th century. The museum's most famous single treasure is the terracotta funerary monument, the almost life-size Bride and Groom (the so-called Sarcofago degli Sposi, or Sarcophagus of the Spouses), reclining as if they were at a dinner party. Other objects held are: - The Etruscan-Phoenician Pyrgi Tablets - The Apollo of Veii - The Cista Ficoroni - A reconstructed frieze displaying Tydeus eating the brain of his enemy Melanippus - The Tita Vendia vase - The Centaur of Vulci
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National Etruscan Museum of Villa Giulia
9 Via di Villa Giulia
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The National Etruscan Museum (Italian: Museo Nazionale Etrusco) is a museum of the Etruscan civilization, housed in the Villa Giulia in Rome. The villa was built for Pope Julius III, for whom it was named. It remained in papal property until 1870, when, in the wake of the Risorgimento and the demise of the Papal States, it became the property of the Kingdom of Italy. The museum was founded in 1889 as part of the same nationalistic movement, with the aim of collecting together all the pre-Roman antiquities of Latium, southern Etruria and Umbria belonging to the Etruscan and Faliscan civilizations, and has been housed in the villa since the beginning of the 20th century. The museum's most famous single treasure is the terracotta funerary monument, the almost life-size Bride and Groom (the so-called Sarcofago degli Sposi, or Sarcophagus of the Spouses), reclining as if they were at a dinner party. Other objects held are: - The Etruscan-Phoenician Pyrgi Tablets - The Apollo of Veii - The Cista Ficoroni - A reconstructed frieze displaying Tydeus eating the brain of his enemy Melanippus - The Tita Vendia vase - The Centaur of Vulci
The most beautiful Squares
Piazza Navona is built on the site of the Stadium of Domitian, built in the 1st century AD, and follows the form of the open space of the stadium. The ancient Romans went there to watch the agones ("games"), and hence it was known as "Circus Agonalis" ("competition arena"). It is believed that over time the name changed to in avone to navone and eventually to navona. Defined as a public space in the last years of 15th century, when the city market was transferred there from the Campidoglio, Piazza Navona was transformed into a highly significant example of Baroque Roman architecture and art during the pontificate of Innocent X, who reigned from 1644 until 1655, and whose family palace, the Palazzo Pamphili, faced the piazza. It features important sculptural creations: in the center stands the famous Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi or Fountain of the Four Rivers (1651) by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, topped by the Obelisk of Domitian, brought in pieces from the Circus of Maxentius; the church of Sant'Agnese in Agone by Francesco Borromini, Girolamo Rainaldi, Carlo Rainaldi and others; and the aforementioned Pamphili palace, also by Girolamo Rainaldi, that accommodates the long gallery designed by Borromini and frescoed by Pietro da Cortona. Piazza Navona has two other fountains. At the southern end is the Fontana del Moro with a basin and four Tritons sculpted by Giacomo della Porta (1575) to which, in 1673, Bernini added a statue of a Moor, wrestling with a dolphin. At the northern end is the Fountain of Neptune (1574) also created by Giacomo della Porta; the statue of Neptune, by Antonio Della Bitta, was added in 1878 to create a balance with La Fontana del Moro.
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Piazza Navona
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Piazza Navona is built on the site of the Stadium of Domitian, built in the 1st century AD, and follows the form of the open space of the stadium. The ancient Romans went there to watch the agones ("games"), and hence it was known as "Circus Agonalis" ("competition arena"). It is believed that over time the name changed to in avone to navone and eventually to navona. Defined as a public space in the last years of 15th century, when the city market was transferred there from the Campidoglio, Piazza Navona was transformed into a highly significant example of Baroque Roman architecture and art during the pontificate of Innocent X, who reigned from 1644 until 1655, and whose family palace, the Palazzo Pamphili, faced the piazza. It features important sculptural creations: in the center stands the famous Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi or Fountain of the Four Rivers (1651) by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, topped by the Obelisk of Domitian, brought in pieces from the Circus of Maxentius; the church of Sant'Agnese in Agone by Francesco Borromini, Girolamo Rainaldi, Carlo Rainaldi and others; and the aforementioned Pamphili palace, also by Girolamo Rainaldi, that accommodates the long gallery designed by Borromini and frescoed by Pietro da Cortona. Piazza Navona has two other fountains. At the southern end is the Fontana del Moro with a basin and four Tritons sculpted by Giacomo della Porta (1575) to which, in 1673, Bernini added a statue of a Moor, wrestling with a dolphin. At the northern end is the Fountain of Neptune (1574) also created by Giacomo della Porta; the statue of Neptune, by Antonio Della Bitta, was added in 1878 to create a balance with La Fontana del Moro.
Piazza di Spagna, at the bottom of the Spanish Steps, is one of the most famous squares in Rome. It owes its name to the Palazzo di Spagna, seat of the Embassy of Spain to the Holy See. Nearby is the famed Column of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. In the middle of the square is the famous Fontana della Barcaccia, dating to the beginning of the baroque period, sculpted by Pietro Bernini and his son, the more famous Gian Lorenzo Bernini. SPANISH STEPS The imposing 135-step staircase was inaugurated by Pope Benedict XIII during the 1725 Jubilee; it was released (thanks to French loans granted in 1721–1725) to connect the Bourbon Spanish embassy (from which the square takes its name) to the Church of Trinità dei Monti. At the right corner of the Spanish Steps rises the house of the English poet John Keats, who lived there until his death in 1821: nowadays it has been changed into a museum dedicated to him and his friend Percy Bysshe Shelley, displaying books and memorabilia of English romanticism. At the left corner there is the Babington's tea room, founded in 1893.
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Piazza di Spagna
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Piazza di Spagna, at the bottom of the Spanish Steps, is one of the most famous squares in Rome. It owes its name to the Palazzo di Spagna, seat of the Embassy of Spain to the Holy See. Nearby is the famed Column of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. In the middle of the square is the famous Fontana della Barcaccia, dating to the beginning of the baroque period, sculpted by Pietro Bernini and his son, the more famous Gian Lorenzo Bernini. SPANISH STEPS The imposing 135-step staircase was inaugurated by Pope Benedict XIII during the 1725 Jubilee; it was released (thanks to French loans granted in 1721–1725) to connect the Bourbon Spanish embassy (from which the square takes its name) to the Church of Trinità dei Monti. At the right corner of the Spanish Steps rises the house of the English poet John Keats, who lived there until his death in 1821: nowadays it has been changed into a museum dedicated to him and his friend Percy Bysshe Shelley, displaying books and memorabilia of English romanticism. At the left corner there is the Babington's tea room, founded in 1893.
Piazza del Popolo is a large urban square in Rome. The name in modern Italian literally means "People's Square", but historically it derives from the poplars (populus in Latin, pioppo in Italian) after which the church of Santa Maria del Popolo, in the northeast corner of the piazza, takes its name. The piazza lies inside the northern gate in the Aurelian Walls, once the Porta Flaminia of ancient Rome, and now called the Porta del Popolo. This was the starting point of the Via Flaminia, the road to Ariminum (modern-day Rimini) and the most important route to the north. At the same time, before the age of railroads, it was the traveller's first view of Rome upon arrival. For centuries, the Piazza del Popolo was a place for public executions, the last of which took place in 1826. The layout of the piazza today was designed in neoclassical style between 1811 and 1822 by the architect Giuseppe Valadier,[1] He removed a modest fountain by Giacomo Della Porta, erected in 1572,[2] and demolished some insignificant buildings and haphazard high screening walls to form two semicircles, reminiscent of Bernini's plan for St. Peter's Square, replacing the original cramped trapezoidal square centred on the Via Flaminia. Valadier's Piazza del Popolo, however, incorporated the verdure of trees as an essential element; he conceived his space in a third dimension, expressed in the building of the viale that leads up to the balustraded overlook from the Pincio.
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Piazza del Popolo
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Piazza del Popolo is a large urban square in Rome. The name in modern Italian literally means "People's Square", but historically it derives from the poplars (populus in Latin, pioppo in Italian) after which the church of Santa Maria del Popolo, in the northeast corner of the piazza, takes its name. The piazza lies inside the northern gate in the Aurelian Walls, once the Porta Flaminia of ancient Rome, and now called the Porta del Popolo. This was the starting point of the Via Flaminia, the road to Ariminum (modern-day Rimini) and the most important route to the north. At the same time, before the age of railroads, it was the traveller's first view of Rome upon arrival. For centuries, the Piazza del Popolo was a place for public executions, the last of which took place in 1826. The layout of the piazza today was designed in neoclassical style between 1811 and 1822 by the architect Giuseppe Valadier,[1] He removed a modest fountain by Giacomo Della Porta, erected in 1572,[2] and demolished some insignificant buildings and haphazard high screening walls to form two semicircles, reminiscent of Bernini's plan for St. Peter's Square, replacing the original cramped trapezoidal square centred on the Via Flaminia. Valadier's Piazza del Popolo, however, incorporated the verdure of trees as an essential element; he conceived his space in a third dimension, expressed in the building of the viale that leads up to the balustraded overlook from the Pincio.
Campo de' Fiori is a rectangular square south of Piazza Navona. It is diagonally southeast of the Palazzo della Cancelleria and one block northeast of the Palazzo Farnese. Campo de' Fiori, translated literally from Italian, means "field of flowers". The name dates to the Middle Ages when the area was a meadow. In Ancient Rome, the area was unused space between Pompey's Theatre and the flood-prone Tiber. The square has always remained a focus for commercial and street culture: the surrounding streets are named for trades—Via dei Balestrari (crossbow-makers), Via dei Baullari (coffer-makers), Via dei Cappellari (hat-makers), Via dei Chiavari (key-makers) and Via dei Giubbonari (tailors). With new access streets installed by Sixtus IV— Via Florea and Via Pellegrino— the square became a part of the Via papale ("Pope's road"), the street linking Basilica of St. John Lateran and the Vatican and traversed by the Pope after his election during the so-called "Cavalcata del possesso", when he reached the Lateran from the Vatican to take possession of the city. This urban development brought wealth to the area: A flourishing horse market took place twice a week (Monday and Saturday) and many bar, restaurants and shops came to be situated in Campo de' Fiori.
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Campo de' Fiori
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Campo de' Fiori is a rectangular square south of Piazza Navona. It is diagonally southeast of the Palazzo della Cancelleria and one block northeast of the Palazzo Farnese. Campo de' Fiori, translated literally from Italian, means "field of flowers". The name dates to the Middle Ages when the area was a meadow. In Ancient Rome, the area was unused space between Pompey's Theatre and the flood-prone Tiber. The square has always remained a focus for commercial and street culture: the surrounding streets are named for trades—Via dei Balestrari (crossbow-makers), Via dei Baullari (coffer-makers), Via dei Cappellari (hat-makers), Via dei Chiavari (key-makers) and Via dei Giubbonari (tailors). With new access streets installed by Sixtus IV— Via Florea and Via Pellegrino— the square became a part of the Via papale ("Pope's road"), the street linking Basilica of St. John Lateran and the Vatican and traversed by the Pope after his election during the so-called "Cavalcata del possesso", when he reached the Lateran from the Vatican to take possession of the city. This urban development brought wealth to the area: A flourishing horse market took place twice a week (Monday and Saturday) and many bar, restaurants and shops came to be situated in Campo de' Fiori.
The most important Churches and Basilicas
The Papal Basilica of Saint Peter in the Vatican is a church built in the Renaissance style located in Vatican City, the papal enclave which is within the city of Rome. Designed principally by Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, Carlo Maderno and Gian Lorenzo Bernini, St. Peter's is the most renowned work of Renaissance architecture and the largest church in the world. Heart of the Catholic Church, the Basilica stands where in 324 Constantine had a sanctuary built in honor of the First Apostle who was crucified and buried in that very place. In 1506, Pope Julius II commissioned Donato Bramante to plan the construction of what would be the largest church in the world (22,000 square meters). Bramante, Michelangelo, Giacomo della Porta, were just some of the architects who succeeded in the "factory of San Pietro" in the more than one hundred years it took to complete the grandiose work. The major artists of the Roman Renaissance and the Baroque have left you masterpieces of extraordinary beauty, just think of the marvelous Pietà by Michelangelo, the Chair of St. Peter, the monument of Urban VIII and the sumptuous Baldacchino by Bernini. To the east of the basilica is the Piazza di San Pietro, (St. Peter's Square). The present arrangement, constructed between 1656 and 1667, is the Baroque inspiration of Bernini who inherited a location already occupied by an Egyptian obelisk which was centrally placed.
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Peterskyrkan
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The Papal Basilica of Saint Peter in the Vatican is a church built in the Renaissance style located in Vatican City, the papal enclave which is within the city of Rome. Designed principally by Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, Carlo Maderno and Gian Lorenzo Bernini, St. Peter's is the most renowned work of Renaissance architecture and the largest church in the world. Heart of the Catholic Church, the Basilica stands where in 324 Constantine had a sanctuary built in honor of the First Apostle who was crucified and buried in that very place. In 1506, Pope Julius II commissioned Donato Bramante to plan the construction of what would be the largest church in the world (22,000 square meters). Bramante, Michelangelo, Giacomo della Porta, were just some of the architects who succeeded in the "factory of San Pietro" in the more than one hundred years it took to complete the grandiose work. The major artists of the Roman Renaissance and the Baroque have left you masterpieces of extraordinary beauty, just think of the marvelous Pietà by Michelangelo, the Chair of St. Peter, the monument of Urban VIII and the sumptuous Baldacchino by Bernini. To the east of the basilica is the Piazza di San Pietro, (St. Peter's Square). The present arrangement, constructed between 1656 and 1667, is the Baroque inspiration of Bernini who inherited a location already occupied by an Egyptian obelisk which was centrally placed.
The Papal Archbasilica of Saint John [in] Lateran is the oldest and highest ranking of the four papal major basilicas, holding the unique title of "archbasilica". It is the oldest public church in the city of Rome, and the oldest basilica of the Western world. It houses the cathedra of the Roman bishop and has the title of ecumenical mother church of the Catholic faithful. The Basilica, which was immediately richly decorated, was often the object of devastation and depredation by the so-called barbarian invaders and over the centuries it underwent numerous restorations and renovations. Among the most important are the works by Pope Boniface VIII for the first great Jubilee of 1300: they were called Cimabue and Giotto for the decorations of the new Loggia delle Benedizioni, today unfortunately lost. At the end of 1300, with the definite return of the popes to Rome after the period of Avignon captivity, it was decided to transfer the papal see to the Vatican. From 1600 onwards it was the great Francesco Borromini who took care of its rearrangement, under the patronage of Pope Innocent X first and Alexander VII later, who also had the bronze doors of the ancient Curia transferred from the Church of Sant'Adriano to the Roman Forum. Roman that today constitute the great central door of the Basilica. But it will be only in 1700 that the facade will be completed by Alessandro Galilei, while the last major intervention will take place a century later under the pontificates of Pius IX and Leo XIII, although the last addition took place in 2000, with the inauguration of the new Holy Door, the work of the sculptor Floriano Bodini.
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Lateranbasilikan
4 Piazza di S. Giovanni in Laterano
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The Papal Archbasilica of Saint John [in] Lateran is the oldest and highest ranking of the four papal major basilicas, holding the unique title of "archbasilica". It is the oldest public church in the city of Rome, and the oldest basilica of the Western world. It houses the cathedra of the Roman bishop and has the title of ecumenical mother church of the Catholic faithful. The Basilica, which was immediately richly decorated, was often the object of devastation and depredation by the so-called barbarian invaders and over the centuries it underwent numerous restorations and renovations. Among the most important are the works by Pope Boniface VIII for the first great Jubilee of 1300: they were called Cimabue and Giotto for the decorations of the new Loggia delle Benedizioni, today unfortunately lost. At the end of 1300, with the definite return of the popes to Rome after the period of Avignon captivity, it was decided to transfer the papal see to the Vatican. From 1600 onwards it was the great Francesco Borromini who took care of its rearrangement, under the patronage of Pope Innocent X first and Alexander VII later, who also had the bronze doors of the ancient Curia transferred from the Church of Sant'Adriano to the Roman Forum. Roman that today constitute the great central door of the Basilica. But it will be only in 1700 that the facade will be completed by Alessandro Galilei, while the last major intervention will take place a century later under the pontificates of Pius IX and Leo XIII, although the last addition took place in 2000, with the inauguration of the new Holy Door, the work of the sculptor Floriano Bodini.
If you arrive at Termini Station, within walking distance you will find one of the most beautiful and majestic churches in Rome. The Basilica of Saint Mary Major is a Papal major basilica and the largest Catholic Marian church in Rome. The basilica enshrines the venerated image of Salus Populi Romani, depicting the Blessed Virgin Mary as the help and protectress of the Roman people, which was granted a Canonical coronation by Pope Gregory XVI on 15 August 1838 accompanied by his Papal bull Cælestis Regina. It is one of the four papal basilicas of Rome and the only one to have preserved the original early Christian structure, albeit with some additions. Legend has it that it arose at the explicit request of the Virgin Mary, who appeared in a dream to Pope Liberius (352-366). The Romanesque bell tower is 75 meters high, the highest in Rome, and was built between 1375-1376.
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Santa Maria Maggiore
42 Piazza di S. Maria Maggiore
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If you arrive at Termini Station, within walking distance you will find one of the most beautiful and majestic churches in Rome. The Basilica of Saint Mary Major is a Papal major basilica and the largest Catholic Marian church in Rome. The basilica enshrines the venerated image of Salus Populi Romani, depicting the Blessed Virgin Mary as the help and protectress of the Roman people, which was granted a Canonical coronation by Pope Gregory XVI on 15 August 1838 accompanied by his Papal bull Cælestis Regina. It is one of the four papal basilicas of Rome and the only one to have preserved the original early Christian structure, albeit with some additions. Legend has it that it arose at the explicit request of the Virgin Mary, who appeared in a dream to Pope Liberius (352-366). The Romanesque bell tower is 75 meters high, the highest in Rome, and was built between 1375-1376.
The historic Baths of Rome
The Baths of Caracalla (Italian: Terme di Caracalla) were the city's second largest Roman public baths, or thermae, likely built between AD 212 and 217, during the reigns of emperors Septimius Severus and Caracalla. They were in operation until the 530s and then fell into disuse and ruin. The bath complex covered approximately 25 hectares (62 acres). The complex is rectangular, measuring 337 by 328 meters. Several million bricks were used in the construction. The baths contained at least 252 columns, 16 of which had a height of over 12 meters. The "baths" were the second to have a public library within the complex. Like other public libraries in Rome, there were two separate and equal sized rooms or buildings; one for Greek language texts and one for Latin language texts. The baths consisted of a central frigidarium (cold room) measuring 58 by 24 m (190 by 79 ft) under three groin vaults 32.9 m (108 ft) high, a double pool tepidarium (medium), and a circular caldarium (hot room) 35 m (115 ft) in diameter, as well as two palaestras (gyms where wrestling and boxing were practiced). The northeastern end of the bath building contained a natatio or swimming pool. The caldarium had seven pools, the frigidarium four, the tepidarium two. Next to the caldarium were saunas.
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Baths of Caracalla
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The Baths of Caracalla (Italian: Terme di Caracalla) were the city's second largest Roman public baths, or thermae, likely built between AD 212 and 217, during the reigns of emperors Septimius Severus and Caracalla. They were in operation until the 530s and then fell into disuse and ruin. The bath complex covered approximately 25 hectares (62 acres). The complex is rectangular, measuring 337 by 328 meters. Several million bricks were used in the construction. The baths contained at least 252 columns, 16 of which had a height of over 12 meters. The "baths" were the second to have a public library within the complex. Like other public libraries in Rome, there were two separate and equal sized rooms or buildings; one for Greek language texts and one for Latin language texts. The baths consisted of a central frigidarium (cold room) measuring 58 by 24 m (190 by 79 ft) under three groin vaults 32.9 m (108 ft) high, a double pool tepidarium (medium), and a circular caldarium (hot room) 35 m (115 ft) in diameter, as well as two palaestras (gyms where wrestling and boxing were practiced). The northeastern end of the bath building contained a natatio or swimming pool. The caldarium had seven pools, the frigidarium four, the tepidarium two. Next to the caldarium were saunas.
The Baths of Diocletian were public baths in ancient Rome. Named after emperor Diocletian and built from 298 AD to 306 AD, they were the largest of the imperial baths. The project was originally commissioned by Maximian upon his return to Rome in the autumn of 298 and was continued after his and Diocletian's abdication under Constantius, father of Constantine. The baths occupy the high-ground on the northeast summit of the Viminal, the smallest of the Seven hills of Rome, just inside the Agger of the Servian Wall (near what are today the Piazza della Repubblica and Termini rail station).  In the early 5th century, the baths were restored.[6]:7 The baths remained in use until the siege of Rome in 537[7] when the Ostrogothic king Vitiges cut off the aqueducts. In the 1560s, Pope Pius IV ordered the building of a basilica in some of the remains, to commemorate Christian martyrs who according to legend died during the baths' construction, Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri. To this was attached a Carthusian charterhouse. Michelangelo was commissioned to design the church and he made use of both the frigidarium and tepidarium structures. He also planned the main cloister of the charterhouse. A small cloister next to the presbytery of the church was built, occupying part of the area where the baths' natatio had been located.  In 1889, the Italian government set up the Museo Nazionale Romano in the baths and in the charterhouse.
Terme Diocleziano
The Baths of Diocletian were public baths in ancient Rome. Named after emperor Diocletian and built from 298 AD to 306 AD, they were the largest of the imperial baths. The project was originally commissioned by Maximian upon his return to Rome in the autumn of 298 and was continued after his and Diocletian's abdication under Constantius, father of Constantine. The baths occupy the high-ground on the northeast summit of the Viminal, the smallest of the Seven hills of Rome, just inside the Agger of the Servian Wall (near what are today the Piazza della Repubblica and Termini rail station).  In the early 5th century, the baths were restored.[6]:7 The baths remained in use until the siege of Rome in 537[7] when the Ostrogothic king Vitiges cut off the aqueducts. In the 1560s, Pope Pius IV ordered the building of a basilica in some of the remains, to commemorate Christian martyrs who according to legend died during the baths' construction, Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri. To this was attached a Carthusian charterhouse. Michelangelo was commissioned to design the church and he made use of both the frigidarium and tepidarium structures. He also planned the main cloister of the charterhouse. A small cloister next to the presbytery of the church was built, occupying part of the area where the baths' natatio had been located.  In 1889, the Italian government set up the Museo Nazionale Romano in the baths and in the charterhouse.