Here My Guide Of Garbatella Neighbor

Carlos
Here My Guide Of Garbatella Neighbor

Coffee Shop

Here The Best Coffee Shop Around he House.
If you want drink avery good coffee or Cappuccino relaxing while you read a good book or listen some good music thisisthe perfect place
10 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Le Storie Libreria Bistrot Roma
37/39 Via Giulio Rocco
10 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
If you want drink avery good coffee or Cappuccino relaxing while you read a good book or listen some good music thisisthe perfect place
Italian classic Dolce Talking about the Italian desserts, Tiramisu' would be one of the tops! Tiramisu' means "Lift me up (cheer me) !" This name has a message of who enjoy this dessert thinking like this; "since it's so delicious I'm sure that you can make me healthy!!!". Everyone should wish to eat a delicious authentic Tiramisu' by all means during the Italian traveling. However it's often difficult to know which shop is the most delicious... Don't worry, here is introduced the most famous Tiramisu' shop in Rome. Recommended shop Pompi Pompi was founded in 1962 by Mr. Giuliano Pompi. Originally, they were offering only a simple breakfast. In order to meet the requests of customers they started also lunch menu (Tuesday - Saturday, 12:30 - 15:30) with desserts. Now they provide also the APERITIME, a buffet service from 18.30. This shop became very popular among local people of a wide range of ages. Anyway, if you don't like a bitter taste of coffee, don't miss this Tiramisu'shop. Alongside the classic coffee taste, they offer other types of Tiramisu' like strawberry etc. You can choose a new taste from their showcase. It's also possible to take away. Most bars in Italy ask you to do payment at first and to order showing receipts to Baristas. However, here you can be seated and make your order at first. Then when your plate is delivered, you can pay at the table directly. Tiramisu' experience at Pompi When I visited with my boyfriend in the evening (around 19.00), the APERITIME had begun. During this exclusive cocktail buffet time, a young DJ was playing exciting musics for young people. If you prefer to enjoy a delicious Tiramisu' quietly and slowly in the natural day light, it's recommended to visit in the morning. My boyfriend ordered a regular Tiramisu' of coffee flavor and I tried a strawberry one. Both were really good. Coffee Tiramisu' was very classic and all tastes of coffee, egg, rum and sugar were keeping a good balance. Their harmony was just right and its smooth and soft touch was so great. Strawberry Tiramisu' had a cute look. It was decorated with lots of sour strawberries, and this sour taste created an unique harmony with cream. We could have a happy moment, which was very affordable. For two Tiramisu' cost 7 euros with two glasses of water. Easy access This shop offers also excellent transport access to a transport. It takes only 3 minutes by foot from the metro station Re di Roma (A line). Please come to enjoy a delicious Tiramisu' with a high reputation not only in Rome, but also all through Italy!
351 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Pompi
7 b Via Albalonga
351 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Italian classic Dolce Talking about the Italian desserts, Tiramisu' would be one of the tops! Tiramisu' means "Lift me up (cheer me) !" This name has a message of who enjoy this dessert thinking like this; "since it's so delicious I'm sure that you can make me healthy!!!". Everyone should wish to eat a delicious authentic Tiramisu' by all means during the Italian traveling. However it's often difficult to know which shop is the most delicious... Don't worry, here is introduced the most famous Tiramisu' shop in Rome. Recommended shop Pompi Pompi was founded in 1962 by Mr. Giuliano Pompi. Originally, they were offering only a simple breakfast. In order to meet the requests of customers they started also lunch menu (Tuesday - Saturday, 12:30 - 15:30) with desserts. Now they provide also the APERITIME, a buffet service from 18.30. This shop became very popular among local people of a wide range of ages. Anyway, if you don't like a bitter taste of coffee, don't miss this Tiramisu'shop. Alongside the classic coffee taste, they offer other types of Tiramisu' like strawberry etc. You can choose a new taste from their showcase. It's also possible to take away. Most bars in Italy ask you to do payment at first and to order showing receipts to Baristas. However, here you can be seated and make your order at first. Then when your plate is delivered, you can pay at the table directly. Tiramisu' experience at Pompi When I visited with my boyfriend in the evening (around 19.00), the APERITIME had begun. During this exclusive cocktail buffet time, a young DJ was playing exciting musics for young people. If you prefer to enjoy a delicious Tiramisu' quietly and slowly in the natural day light, it's recommended to visit in the morning. My boyfriend ordered a regular Tiramisu' of coffee flavor and I tried a strawberry one. Both were really good. Coffee Tiramisu' was very classic and all tastes of coffee, egg, rum and sugar were keeping a good balance. Their harmony was just right and its smooth and soft touch was so great. Strawberry Tiramisu' had a cute look. It was decorated with lots of sour strawberries, and this sour taste created an unique harmony with cream. We could have a happy moment, which was very affordable. For two Tiramisu' cost 7 euros with two glasses of water. Easy access This shop offers also excellent transport access to a transport. It takes only 3 minutes by foot from the metro station Re di Roma (A line). Please come to enjoy a delicious Tiramisu' with a high reputation not only in Rome, but also all through Italy!

The Guides to the Neighborhoods around the House

Here you can see and learn about the neighborhoods surrounding our home
If you want to see and fell the real Roman Life ...this isthe Place!!!
1331 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Trastevere
1331 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
If you want to see and fell the real Roman Life ...this isthe Place!!!
TheThe past appears almost nonchalantly in Testaccio, a Roman neighborhood both centrally located and a world unto itself: a 2,000-year-old arch props up a restaurant wall; dodgy nightclubs burrow into a hill made entirely of broken terra-cotta amphorae; and concert halls and art museums have colonized a shuttered slaughterhouse that was, for a nearly 100 years, the quarter’s bloody beating heart. Given the dazzling array of monuments and masterpieces in Rome, an antique rubbish dump and a shuttered slaughterhouse are not obviously appealing landmarks. But Testaccio’s layers of history, so unevenly buried, are profoundly Roman. When you tire of hoofing from famous site to famous site, spend a day here absorbing the rhythm of daily life. Bounded by the busy Via Marmorata on one side and the ancient city wall on the other, with the Tiber river providing a deep curve, Testaccio’s shape resembles a large wedge of cheese. Despite the neighborhood’s struggle with change and gentrification, many residents still are direct descendants of the first inhabitants, veri testaccini, who at the turn of the 20th century moved into a pre-planned grid of homes, shops, and schools built for industrial and slaughterhouse workers. The neighborhood still functions like a tightly knit, gossipy village rather than the center of a capital city. Geographic isolation and the residents’ deep roots have also ensured the survival of traditional cuisine, especially the offal-based, or quinto quarto, dishes thought to have been pioneered by slaughterhouse workers and their families. Start in the morning at one of the 19 bars which punctuate Testaccio (bar means coffee shop with a bar or counter; caffè means espresso.) Some of Testaccio’s bars are functional, working places that really don’t serve much beyond espresso and cappuccino, a few spirits, and maybe a sandwich so old its edges are curling. Bar Tabacchi da Rosa e Andrea, standing alone in front of the old slaughterhouse, is a wonderful time-warp. Other bars, like Testaccino, once a workaday place that never had any ice, have been smartened up and now serve goblets of luminous Campari spritz to locals and me. No matter where you go, the routine is the same: Pay at the cash desk first, place the receipt on the bar with a winking 10-cent coin to catch the barista’s eye, order, wait, and drink standing up.
Testaccio
TheThe past appears almost nonchalantly in Testaccio, a Roman neighborhood both centrally located and a world unto itself: a 2,000-year-old arch props up a restaurant wall; dodgy nightclubs burrow into a hill made entirely of broken terra-cotta amphorae; and concert halls and art museums have colonized a shuttered slaughterhouse that was, for a nearly 100 years, the quarter’s bloody beating heart. Given the dazzling array of monuments and masterpieces in Rome, an antique rubbish dump and a shuttered slaughterhouse are not obviously appealing landmarks. But Testaccio’s layers of history, so unevenly buried, are profoundly Roman. When you tire of hoofing from famous site to famous site, spend a day here absorbing the rhythm of daily life. Bounded by the busy Via Marmorata on one side and the ancient city wall on the other, with the Tiber river providing a deep curve, Testaccio’s shape resembles a large wedge of cheese. Despite the neighborhood’s struggle with change and gentrification, many residents still are direct descendants of the first inhabitants, veri testaccini, who at the turn of the 20th century moved into a pre-planned grid of homes, shops, and schools built for industrial and slaughterhouse workers. The neighborhood still functions like a tightly knit, gossipy village rather than the center of a capital city. Geographic isolation and the residents’ deep roots have also ensured the survival of traditional cuisine, especially the offal-based, or quinto quarto, dishes thought to have been pioneered by slaughterhouse workers and their families. Start in the morning at one of the 19 bars which punctuate Testaccio (bar means coffee shop with a bar or counter; caffè means espresso.) Some of Testaccio’s bars are functional, working places that really don’t serve much beyond espresso and cappuccino, a few spirits, and maybe a sandwich so old its edges are curling. Bar Tabacchi da Rosa e Andrea, standing alone in front of the old slaughterhouse, is a wonderful time-warp. Other bars, like Testaccino, once a workaday place that never had any ice, have been smartened up and now serve goblets of luminous Campari spritz to locals and me. No matter where you go, the routine is the same: Pay at the cash desk first, place the receipt on the bar with a winking 10-cent coin to catch the barista’s eye, order, wait, and drink standing up.
It only takes a few minutes of walking through Garbatella to spot how different this quiet area is from the Roman districts slightly closer to the centro storico. Found three metro stops over from the Colosseum, Garbatella is preparing to celebrate its first centennial, making this destination a very young one by Eternal City standards. The unique neighborhood was established in 1920 as part of a planned community to house the workers who flocked to the capital for jobs in the nearby industrial Ostiense area. What makes Garbatella so intriguing is its distinctive design. This Rome neighborhood was modeled on the garden city suburbs that were popular in England in the early 20thcentury, creating a particularly unique style of architecture and sense of community. But from its humble origins, Garbatella has grown into one of Rome’s culture centers, with art, architecture, gastronomy, and performances waiting to be uncovered. Here is how to experience the district for yourself with a guide to spending one day in Garbatella. Breakfast With ample outdoor tables and plenty of homegrown characters, Bar Foschi has been Garbatella’s favorite coffee bar since the 1950s. New pastries and biscotti appear with the seasons, including chestnut flour cake in autumn and tartlets topped with tiny wild strawberries in summer. However, the fresh cornetti filled with jam or honey and a strong coffee are the best way to kick start a morning of living like a local in this beloved corner for Rome. Take the pastries and cappuccini outside to enjoy the simple morning meal overlooking the neighborhood’s iconic Palladium theater. bar foschi garbatella Morning To truly experience Garbatella, you need to start with the lotto. Rather than a gamble, “lotto” in this case refers to the unique style of housing in the neighborhood. Keep an eye out near the entrances to the small clusters of apartments and you will note numbered lotti – property lots. lotti in Garbatella Rome The flats in Garbatella were first constructed as public housing and each small complex was included in a numbered system as part of the organization and administration. The homes have all long since been privatized but the lotti remain. Each lotto has different architectural elements, but the defining feature is that every set of flats is built around a central courtyard. Step through the open gates along the narrow lanes in the heart of the neighborhood and be transported back to another era. The internal yards were envisioned by the urban planners of 100 years ago as green spaces that could be used as vegetable gardens and gathering places. Today they are still filled with flowers and lines of laundry drying in the sun. lotto sign in Garbatella Rome There are 62 lotti in total and exploring the different gardens and courtyards over a meandering morning stroll is the best way to acquaint yourself with the various corners of the neighborhood while gaining a taste of the individuality found in this singularly Roman quartiere. Lunch The hidden lotti of Garbatella are just the first taste of the tranquil spaces in this traditional neighborhood. On sunny Roman days, the best place for lunch in Garbatella is inside a park tucked away behind the two-story homes. Under the shade of umbrella pines, La Casetta Rossa sets tables outside its little red kitchen to serve up hyper-local cuisine. All of the ingredients in the ever-changing menu come from within a few miles of Rome and the laidback setting has made this eatery a cult favorite in the area. The Casetta Rossa garden restaurant in Rome Afternoon Cross the soaring white-arched Ponte Settimia Spezzichino bridge, named in memory of Rome’s only female survivor of Auschwitz, on the edge of Garbatella. Traversing the Ostiense overpass will bring you to the industrial center where many of the neighborhood’s original residents once worked. Garbatella bridge Still undergoing an urban revival, the old factories are being reclaimed for new enterprises. The best example is the stunning museum of Centrale Montemartini. Inside the decommissioned electrical plant, marble statues are displayed next to gears, levers, and engines which once powered the city. The juxtaposition of old and new, art and industry, is captivating. Moving from Ancient Rome to the 21st century, head back to the center of the neighborhood to take in the contemporary exhibits at 10b Photography. The gallery hosts beautifully curated shows from individuals as well as inspiring exhibits of archival photographs. Drinks With wood-backed chairs and a handwritten chalkboard menu of wines by the glass, Enoteca La Mescita looks the part of a traditional Italian wine bar. A closer look through the labels lining the shelves will reveal that the corner enoteca has an impressive selection of whites, reds, and rosatos from across the country, but puts every emphasis possible on natural wines. Dive into a bottle with a bit of organically-raised salami on the side, and grab one of the few high stools outside for an open-air aperitivo. Dinner The best dinner spot in the neighborhood lies just around the corner at Al Ristoro Degli Angeli. The historic trattoria has been a Garbatella staple for decades and specializes in Roman classics paired with an excellent wine list of bottles from Lazio. For pasta, the cacio e pepe served in a crispy Parmigiano bowl and the homemade fettucine with aged cheese and toasted sesame are both excellent, but it is hard to resist the “Garbatella-style potatoes” based on the ones the owner ate as a child – with bay leaf, rosemary and onions. ristro degli angeli garbatella Afterhours The iconic Teatro Palladium is one of the neighborhood’s most treasured cultural landmarks. It opened as a cinema in the mid-1920s but is now managed by the University of Roma Tre and has a full lineup of dramatic and musical performances. Check the schedule online to plan a night out with seats on the second-level balcony inside the retro theater. teatro palladium garbatella After dinner and a show, wind down the night at Latteria Garbatella. The cocktail spot has a spacious terrace for an outdoor nightcap, or you can snuggle up in the leather lounge chairs flanked by vintage vinyl inside.
105 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Garbatella
105 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
It only takes a few minutes of walking through Garbatella to spot how different this quiet area is from the Roman districts slightly closer to the centro storico. Found three metro stops over from the Colosseum, Garbatella is preparing to celebrate its first centennial, making this destination a very young one by Eternal City standards. The unique neighborhood was established in 1920 as part of a planned community to house the workers who flocked to the capital for jobs in the nearby industrial Ostiense area. What makes Garbatella so intriguing is its distinctive design. This Rome neighborhood was modeled on the garden city suburbs that were popular in England in the early 20thcentury, creating a particularly unique style of architecture and sense of community. But from its humble origins, Garbatella has grown into one of Rome’s culture centers, with art, architecture, gastronomy, and performances waiting to be uncovered. Here is how to experience the district for yourself with a guide to spending one day in Garbatella. Breakfast With ample outdoor tables and plenty of homegrown characters, Bar Foschi has been Garbatella’s favorite coffee bar since the 1950s. New pastries and biscotti appear with the seasons, including chestnut flour cake in autumn and tartlets topped with tiny wild strawberries in summer. However, the fresh cornetti filled with jam or honey and a strong coffee are the best way to kick start a morning of living like a local in this beloved corner for Rome. Take the pastries and cappuccini outside to enjoy the simple morning meal overlooking the neighborhood’s iconic Palladium theater. bar foschi garbatella Morning To truly experience Garbatella, you need to start with the lotto. Rather than a gamble, “lotto” in this case refers to the unique style of housing in the neighborhood. Keep an eye out near the entrances to the small clusters of apartments and you will note numbered lotti – property lots. lotti in Garbatella Rome The flats in Garbatella were first constructed as public housing and each small complex was included in a numbered system as part of the organization and administration. The homes have all long since been privatized but the lotti remain. Each lotto has different architectural elements, but the defining feature is that every set of flats is built around a central courtyard. Step through the open gates along the narrow lanes in the heart of the neighborhood and be transported back to another era. The internal yards were envisioned by the urban planners of 100 years ago as green spaces that could be used as vegetable gardens and gathering places. Today they are still filled with flowers and lines of laundry drying in the sun. lotto sign in Garbatella Rome There are 62 lotti in total and exploring the different gardens and courtyards over a meandering morning stroll is the best way to acquaint yourself with the various corners of the neighborhood while gaining a taste of the individuality found in this singularly Roman quartiere. Lunch The hidden lotti of Garbatella are just the first taste of the tranquil spaces in this traditional neighborhood. On sunny Roman days, the best place for lunch in Garbatella is inside a park tucked away behind the two-story homes. Under the shade of umbrella pines, La Casetta Rossa sets tables outside its little red kitchen to serve up hyper-local cuisine. All of the ingredients in the ever-changing menu come from within a few miles of Rome and the laidback setting has made this eatery a cult favorite in the area. The Casetta Rossa garden restaurant in Rome Afternoon Cross the soaring white-arched Ponte Settimia Spezzichino bridge, named in memory of Rome’s only female survivor of Auschwitz, on the edge of Garbatella. Traversing the Ostiense overpass will bring you to the industrial center where many of the neighborhood’s original residents once worked. Garbatella bridge Still undergoing an urban revival, the old factories are being reclaimed for new enterprises. The best example is the stunning museum of Centrale Montemartini. Inside the decommissioned electrical plant, marble statues are displayed next to gears, levers, and engines which once powered the city. The juxtaposition of old and new, art and industry, is captivating. Moving from Ancient Rome to the 21st century, head back to the center of the neighborhood to take in the contemporary exhibits at 10b Photography. The gallery hosts beautifully curated shows from individuals as well as inspiring exhibits of archival photographs. Drinks With wood-backed chairs and a handwritten chalkboard menu of wines by the glass, Enoteca La Mescita looks the part of a traditional Italian wine bar. A closer look through the labels lining the shelves will reveal that the corner enoteca has an impressive selection of whites, reds, and rosatos from across the country, but puts every emphasis possible on natural wines. Dive into a bottle with a bit of organically-raised salami on the side, and grab one of the few high stools outside for an open-air aperitivo. Dinner The best dinner spot in the neighborhood lies just around the corner at Al Ristoro Degli Angeli. The historic trattoria has been a Garbatella staple for decades and specializes in Roman classics paired with an excellent wine list of bottles from Lazio. For pasta, the cacio e pepe served in a crispy Parmigiano bowl and the homemade fettucine with aged cheese and toasted sesame are both excellent, but it is hard to resist the “Garbatella-style potatoes” based on the ones the owner ate as a child – with bay leaf, rosemary and onions. ristro degli angeli garbatella Afterhours The iconic Teatro Palladium is one of the neighborhood’s most treasured cultural landmarks. It opened as a cinema in the mid-1920s but is now managed by the University of Roma Tre and has a full lineup of dramatic and musical performances. Check the schedule online to plan a night out with seats on the second-level balcony inside the retro theater. teatro palladium garbatella After dinner and a show, wind down the night at Latteria Garbatella. The cocktail spot has a spacious terrace for an outdoor nightcap, or you can snuggle up in the leather lounge chairs flanked by vintage vinyl inside.

Bars

Nice Bar where you can relax drinking good wine or cocktail
35 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
T Bar Ostiense
182/A Via Ostiense
35 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Nice Bar where you can relax drinking good wine or cocktail
Fashion Cocktail Bar ...real Nice
73 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Doppiozeroo
68 Via Ostiense
73 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Fashion Cocktail Bar ...real Nice
good beer and wine in a chill out atmophere
8 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Angeli Rock
193B Via Ostiense
8 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
good beer and wine in a chill out atmophere
House of Music , Nice Disco Nice Person
69 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Goa Club
13 Via Giuseppe Libetta
69 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
House of Music , Nice Disco Nice Person
Disco , Live Music and Nice People
42 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Vinile
19 Via Giuseppe Libetta
42 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Disco , Live Music and Nice People
House of The Beer !!!!
9 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Mastro Titta
11 Via dei Conciatori
9 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
House of The Beer !!!!
nice coolpub ...great location and beer
8 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Il Barone Rosso
7/13 Via Giuseppe Libetta
8 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
nice coolpub ...great location and beer
Good Disco
PEACH Club
9 Via Giuseppe Libetta
Good Disco

Restaurant

Good and Real Roman Food .... also with good price
19 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
La Valle del Sacco
4 Via Bartolomeo Bossi
19 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Good and Real Roman Food .... also with good price
Very Romantic and Good Restaurant where you can eat real Italian and Roman Food ...PASTA IS SPECIAL !!!!
88 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Mò Mò Republic
10 Piazza Carlo Forlanini
88 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Very Romantic and Good Restaurant where you can eat real Italian and Roman Food ...PASTA IS SPECIAL !!!!
Paper thin, crispy and fresh from a wood oven, there's nothing like pizza in Rome. Sit down for an evening meal at neighborhood favorites Ivo a Trastevere. We absolutely loved it at Ivo a Trastevere. Like many other restaurants in Trastevere, it was seemingly tiny when we walked in but sprawled from tiny room to tiny room intricately bound together by narrow hallways and packed to the gills with an endless supply of hungry patrons. In our opinion, it had a very similar menu as La Fraschetta, above, but was a better version. What to order: The pizza here was our favorite of the traditional wood burning round pies that we sampled in Rome — a thin crust and just the right ratio of sauce to cheese. The fried artichokes here were a huge hit as well, but they’re seasonal.
127 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Ivo a Trastevere
158 Via di S. Francesco a Ripa
127 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Paper thin, crispy and fresh from a wood oven, there's nothing like pizza in Rome. Sit down for an evening meal at neighborhood favorites Ivo a Trastevere. We absolutely loved it at Ivo a Trastevere. Like many other restaurants in Trastevere, it was seemingly tiny when we walked in but sprawled from tiny room to tiny room intricately bound together by narrow hallways and packed to the gills with an endless supply of hungry patrons. In our opinion, it had a very similar menu as La Fraschetta, above, but was a better version. What to order: The pizza here was our favorite of the traditional wood burning round pies that we sampled in Rome — a thin crust and just the right ratio of sauce to cheese. The fried artichokes here were a huge hit as well, but they’re seasonal.
One of the best Roman Restaurant in rome
26 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Ristorante Da Oio A Casa Mia Roma
41/43/45 Via Galvani
26 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
One of the best Roman Restaurant in rome
Here You can try one of the best pizza of ROme ....Delicious !!!
219 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Dar Poeta
45 Vicolo del Bologna
219 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Here You can try one of the best pizza of ROme ....Delicious !!!
in this restaurant the desserts are the real stars ... seeing is believing
almacrì
38 Via della Magliana
in this restaurant the desserts are the real stars ... seeing is believing
Nice Pizzeria with a good price ;-) near the house
17 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Al Peperoncino
369 Via Ostiense
17 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Nice Pizzeria with a good price ;-) near the house
aVery Very Nice Restaurant and Coffee where we use todrink a good wine or beer and eat a very good fusion and romandish
16 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Modo Ristorante Caffè
415 Via Ostiense
16 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
aVery Very Nice Restaurant and Coffee where we use todrink a good wine or beer and eat a very good fusion and romandish
Polpetta Gazometro - Cucina & Miscelazione
16 Via del Gazometro
Pizza and Pasta a go go
Old Fashion Pizza
18 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Il Secchio e l'Olivaro Porto Fluviale
3 Via del Porto Fluviale
18 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Old Fashion Pizza

Icecream GELATERIA

Best GELATO (Icecream) IN ROME !!!!! Try it and you will become addicted !!!!
80 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Frigidarium
112 Via del Governo Vecchio
80 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Best GELATO (Icecream) IN ROME !!!!! Try it and you will become addicted !!!!
Handmade Icecream ...Very Good!!!
269 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Gelateria La Romana
60 Via XX Settembre
269 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Handmade Icecream ...Very Good!!!
Hand Made Icecream
15 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Gelateria Miami 3 Roma
22 Via Silvio D'Amico
15 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Hand Made Icecream
Handmade Icecream
19 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Verde Pistacchio
181 Via Ostiense
19 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Handmade Icecream

Breathtaking View

From Spanish Steps a Very breathtaking and romantic view
260 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Pincio Promenade
Viale Gabriele D'Annunzio
260 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
From Spanish Steps a Very breathtaking and romantic view
The Fontana dell'Acqua Paola, better known as the Fontanone (literally "big fountain") is located on the summit of the Janiculum hill. The monumental fountain was built in 1612 to mark the end of the Acqua Paola aqueduct, restored by Pope Paul V, taking its name from him. In more recent times the fountain featured prominently in the introduction to Paolo Sorrentino's Oscar-winning film La Grande Bellezza. The panoramic view from the Fontanone includes Trastevere and the city, as well as the Castelli Romani and the Apennines in the far distance.
190 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Fontana dell'Acqua Paola
Via Garibaldi
190 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
The Fontana dell'Acqua Paola, better known as the Fontanone (literally "big fountain") is located on the summit of the Janiculum hill. The monumental fountain was built in 1612 to mark the end of the Acqua Paola aqueduct, restored by Pope Paul V, taking its name from him. In more recent times the fountain featured prominently in the introduction to Paolo Sorrentino's Oscar-winning film La Grande Bellezza. The panoramic view from the Fontanone includes Trastevere and the city, as well as the Castelli Romani and the Apennines in the far distance.

Visite turistiche

The Piramid of Rome
193 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Pyramid of Caius Cestius
Via Raffaele Persichetti
193 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
The Piramid of Rome
The Colosseum (/ˌkɒləˈsiːəm/ KOL-ə-SEE-əm), also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre (Latin: Amphitheatrum Flavium; Italian: Anfiteatro Flavio [aɱfiteˈaːtro ˈflaːvjo] or Colosseo [kolosˈsɛːo]), is an oval amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy. Built of travertine limestone, tuff (volcanic rock), and brick-faced concrete,[1] it was the largest amphitheatre ever built at the time and held 50,000 to 80,000 spectators. The Colosseum is just east of the Roman Forum. Construction began under the emperor Vespasian in AD 72[2] and was completed in AD 80 under his successor and heir, Titus.[3] Further modifications were made during the reign of Domitian (81–96).[4] These three emperors are known as the Flavian dynasty, and the amphitheatre was named in Latin for its association with their family name (Flavius). The Colosseum could hold an estimated 50,000 to 80,000 spectators at various points of its history over the centuries,[5][6] having an average audience of some 65,000;[7][8] it was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles (for only a short time as the hypogeum was soon filled in with mechanisms to support the other activities), animal hunts, executions, re-enactments of famous battles, and dramas based on Roman mythology. The building ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era. It was later reused for such purposes as housing, workshops, quarters for a religious order, a fortress, a quarry, and a Christian shrine.[citation needed] Although substantially ruined because of earthquakes and stone-robbers, the Colosseum is still an iconic symbol of Imperial Rome and is listed as one of the New7Wonders of the World.[9] It is one of Rome's most popular tourist attractions and also has links to the Roman Catholic Church, as each Good Friday the Pope leads a torchlit "Way of the Cross" procession that starts in the area around the Colosseum.[10]
2614 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
Colosseum
1 Piazza del Colosseo
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The Colosseum (/ˌkɒləˈsiːəm/ KOL-ə-SEE-əm), also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre (Latin: Amphitheatrum Flavium; Italian: Anfiteatro Flavio [aɱfiteˈaːtro ˈflaːvjo] or Colosseo [kolosˈsɛːo]), is an oval amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy. Built of travertine limestone, tuff (volcanic rock), and brick-faced concrete,[1] it was the largest amphitheatre ever built at the time and held 50,000 to 80,000 spectators. The Colosseum is just east of the Roman Forum. Construction began under the emperor Vespasian in AD 72[2] and was completed in AD 80 under his successor and heir, Titus.[3] Further modifications were made during the reign of Domitian (81–96).[4] These three emperors are known as the Flavian dynasty, and the amphitheatre was named in Latin for its association with their family name (Flavius). The Colosseum could hold an estimated 50,000 to 80,000 spectators at various points of its history over the centuries,[5][6] having an average audience of some 65,000;[7][8] it was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles (for only a short time as the hypogeum was soon filled in with mechanisms to support the other activities), animal hunts, executions, re-enactments of famous battles, and dramas based on Roman mythology. The building ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era. It was later reused for such purposes as housing, workshops, quarters for a religious order, a fortress, a quarry, and a Christian shrine.[citation needed] Although substantially ruined because of earthquakes and stone-robbers, the Colosseum is still an iconic symbol of Imperial Rome and is listed as one of the New7Wonders of the World.[9] It is one of Rome's most popular tourist attractions and also has links to the Roman Catholic Church, as each Good Friday the Pope leads a torchlit "Way of the Cross" procession that starts in the area around the Colosseum.[10]
A Roman jewel of industrial archaeology in Ostiense. Looming large over Rome's Ostiense district, the giant Gasometro, or Gazometro, was once used to store the capital's gas supply but has been abandoned since the 1960s when Rome switched to methane. Built by Genoese firm Ansaldo and inaugurated on 13 July 1937, the colossal iron structure is almost 90 metres in height, with a diameter of 63 metres and a capacity of 200 cubic metres.
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Gazometro
9/11 Via del Commercio
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A Roman jewel of industrial archaeology in Ostiense. Looming large over Rome's Ostiense district, the giant Gasometro, or Gazometro, was once used to store the capital's gas supply but has been abandoned since the 1960s when Rome switched to methane. Built by Genoese firm Ansaldo and inaugurated on 13 July 1937, the colossal iron structure is almost 90 metres in height, with a diameter of 63 metres and a capacity of 200 cubic metres.
È una delle quattro basiliche maggiori di Roma, la seconda per dimensioni dopo quella di San Pietro. La costruzione della basilica Dopo l’esecuzione dell’apostolo Paolo, nel I secolo d.C., si innalzò un santuario nel luogo di sepoltura del santo. Nel 324 d.C. qui si consacrò una piccola Chiesa, che fu demolita nel 386 per la costruzione di una basilica maggiore, che fu finalizzata nel 395 d.C. Fra il 1220 e il 1241 si costruì un bellissimo chiostro che ancora si conserva, sopravvissuto al grande incendio del 1823. Dopo l’incendio, il mondo intero fu attento al processo di ricostruzione della chiesa, che successivamente fu dichiarata monumento nazionale. L’interno L’interno della Basilica di San Paolo è straordinario, con le enormi colonne d’alabastro e i preziosi mosaici dorati. Purtroppo, a causa dell’incendio del 1823, sono poche le parti medievali della basilica che si conservano intatte, anche se comunque si possono ancora contemplare alcuni mosaici del XIII secolo, un gran candelabro del XII secolo e il baldacchino in marmo del 1285, sotto il quale è sepolto San Paolo. Nelle parti superiori delle pareti, si possono osservare i ritratti dei vari papi che si sono alternati nel corso della storia. Probabilmente la parte più interesante della Chiesa è il grandioso atrio dotato di 150 colonne, da cui si può contemplare l’esterno della chiesa ricoperto da un enorme mosaico dorato, realizzato fra il 1854 e il 1874, che riflette i raggi del sole. Il centro del grande cortile con giardino è dominato da una colossale statua di San Paolo. Uno dei maggiori tesori che si trovano nella chiesa è il chiostro costruito fra il 1208 e il 1235, sopravvissuto al grande incendio e che attualmente si trova in perfetto stato di conservazione. Un poco lontana, ma merita la pena Pur non essendo ubicata nel centro della città, se avete tempo a disposizione vi raccomandiamo di raggiungere la basilica, per contemplare i suoi impressionanti mosaici. San Paolo fuori le Mura è una delle chiese più belle di Roma.
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Basilica San Paolo
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È una delle quattro basiliche maggiori di Roma, la seconda per dimensioni dopo quella di San Pietro. La costruzione della basilica Dopo l’esecuzione dell’apostolo Paolo, nel I secolo d.C., si innalzò un santuario nel luogo di sepoltura del santo. Nel 324 d.C. qui si consacrò una piccola Chiesa, che fu demolita nel 386 per la costruzione di una basilica maggiore, che fu finalizzata nel 395 d.C. Fra il 1220 e il 1241 si costruì un bellissimo chiostro che ancora si conserva, sopravvissuto al grande incendio del 1823. Dopo l’incendio, il mondo intero fu attento al processo di ricostruzione della chiesa, che successivamente fu dichiarata monumento nazionale. L’interno L’interno della Basilica di San Paolo è straordinario, con le enormi colonne d’alabastro e i preziosi mosaici dorati. Purtroppo, a causa dell’incendio del 1823, sono poche le parti medievali della basilica che si conservano intatte, anche se comunque si possono ancora contemplare alcuni mosaici del XIII secolo, un gran candelabro del XII secolo e il baldacchino in marmo del 1285, sotto il quale è sepolto San Paolo. Nelle parti superiori delle pareti, si possono osservare i ritratti dei vari papi che si sono alternati nel corso della storia. Probabilmente la parte più interesante della Chiesa è il grandioso atrio dotato di 150 colonne, da cui si può contemplare l’esterno della chiesa ricoperto da un enorme mosaico dorato, realizzato fra il 1854 e il 1874, che riflette i raggi del sole. Il centro del grande cortile con giardino è dominato da una colossale statua di San Paolo. Uno dei maggiori tesori che si trovano nella chiesa è il chiostro costruito fra il 1208 e il 1235, sopravvissuto al grande incendio e che attualmente si trova in perfetto stato di conservazione. Un poco lontana, ma merita la pena Pur non essendo ubicata nel centro della città, se avete tempo a disposizione vi raccomandiamo di raggiungere la basilica, per contemplare i suoi impressionanti mosaici. San Paolo fuori le Mura è una delle chiese più belle di Roma.
Santa Maria in Trastevere is a 12th century minor basilica of ancient foundation in the rione Trastevere, and is also a parish and titular church. The postal address is Via della Paglia 14/C, which is a side entrance. The main entrance is on the Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere. The church has always been the focus of local religious and civic life and, as has been famously remarked, if Trastevere were a small city on a dusty hilltop in southern Italy, instead of being a district on the 'wrong' side of the river in the heart of Rome, Santa Maria in Trastevere would be its cathedral. Pictures of the church on Wikimedia Commons are here. There is an English Wikipedia article here. The dedication is to the Blessed Virgin Mary, under the aspect of her Assumption.
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Basilica of Our Lady in Trastevere
Piazza di Santa Maria in Trastevere
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Santa Maria in Trastevere is a 12th century minor basilica of ancient foundation in the rione Trastevere, and is also a parish and titular church. The postal address is Via della Paglia 14/C, which is a side entrance. The main entrance is on the Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere. The church has always been the focus of local religious and civic life and, as has been famously remarked, if Trastevere were a small city on a dusty hilltop in southern Italy, instead of being a district on the 'wrong' side of the river in the heart of Rome, Santa Maria in Trastevere would be its cathedral. Pictures of the church on Wikimedia Commons are here. There is an English Wikipedia article here. The dedication is to the Blessed Virgin Mary, under the aspect of her Assumption.
he most interesting spot is the Spanish Steps The most interesting spot of the Spanish Square would be the biggest Spanish Steps. These steps have a real name, "Scalinata di Trinità dei Monti". It had been completed by a donation from a French diplomat in 1725. It's obvious that the nickname of Spanish Steps came from the Spanish embassy which had been here. But knowing the source of such costs, it would be better to call the French Steps? Flowing waves, a feature of the Baroque period has been incorporated into the dramatic design. It's quite large and divided into two ways in the middle. It's really an artistic style. Let's overlook the whole Rome from the top of the steps There are 135 steps to the top. You can enjoy views of the bottom taking a rest at the small square on the halfway. On the top, there are also fences from which you can overlook the whole view of the square. The views from these locations are the best. Especially, a sunset view of Rome will be unforgettable forever. Every year at the beginning of May, big pink azalea pots are arranged in the middle of the steps. Unfortunately now, it's prohibited to eat gelato on the steps like a scene of the film "Roman Holiday", for the protection of cultural heritage. Except on rainy days it's filled with a lot of people always. From the top you can admire St. Peter's Basilica far away. It's sure that you would be impressed by a lovely beauty of this town. Sinking "Barcaccia" has a meaning The Square below the Spanish Steps has the "Fountain of Barcaccia" built in 1627. As a fountain it has a strange and unusual shape, like a sinking ship. Therefore it had been named Barcaccia (small ship). It's said that the sculptor Pietro Bernini had been inspired by a scene of a floating ship by flooding on the river Tiber. His famous son, Gian Lorenzo Bernini had also helped the work of this fountain. The ship has a decoration of the bee, the symbol of the family Barberini. On top of the steps, there is the French Church of Trinità dei Monti On the top of the stairs, there is a France church, the church of Trinita' dei Monti (Chiesa della Trinita' dei Monti). This Gothic church had been completed in the late 16th century. At that time, between the Spanish Square and this church on the hill, there was a cliff separating the way. To resolve this inconvenience, France donated a grand staircase in 1725 hoping the peace between the Spain, which had had its embassy in this place, as well as France. The facade has a beautiful French design, simple and symmetrical. At that time, the two bell towers had each clock showing the time of Rome and the time of Paris. Now only the left one has remained. In front of the church there is a small square full of souvenir shops and portrait painters. In front of the square, shopping area is following The metro station Spagna on the line A is only 2 stations from the central Termini Station in Rome. In addition, the Spanish Square is surrounded by best known shopping venues. Therefore, many many people of Rome as well as tourists visit here every day. Via Condotti, one of the most luxury brand shops street, Via del Babuino and Via del Corso, where there are various popular shops etc. You can just enjoy window shopping alone. But it's considerable distance... Anyway, the Spanish Square's area has both a long history and a new fashion mode. It's full of lively people in the daytime and at night is illuminated by subdued lightings. It would be a representative place of amazing Rome for you.
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Piazza di Spagna Suites
93 Piazza di Spagna
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he most interesting spot is the Spanish Steps The most interesting spot of the Spanish Square would be the biggest Spanish Steps. These steps have a real name, "Scalinata di Trinità dei Monti". It had been completed by a donation from a French diplomat in 1725. It's obvious that the nickname of Spanish Steps came from the Spanish embassy which had been here. But knowing the source of such costs, it would be better to call the French Steps? Flowing waves, a feature of the Baroque period has been incorporated into the dramatic design. It's quite large and divided into two ways in the middle. It's really an artistic style. Let's overlook the whole Rome from the top of the steps There are 135 steps to the top. You can enjoy views of the bottom taking a rest at the small square on the halfway. On the top, there are also fences from which you can overlook the whole view of the square. The views from these locations are the best. Especially, a sunset view of Rome will be unforgettable forever. Every year at the beginning of May, big pink azalea pots are arranged in the middle of the steps. Unfortunately now, it's prohibited to eat gelato on the steps like a scene of the film "Roman Holiday", for the protection of cultural heritage. Except on rainy days it's filled with a lot of people always. From the top you can admire St. Peter's Basilica far away. It's sure that you would be impressed by a lovely beauty of this town. Sinking "Barcaccia" has a meaning The Square below the Spanish Steps has the "Fountain of Barcaccia" built in 1627. As a fountain it has a strange and unusual shape, like a sinking ship. Therefore it had been named Barcaccia (small ship). It's said that the sculptor Pietro Bernini had been inspired by a scene of a floating ship by flooding on the river Tiber. His famous son, Gian Lorenzo Bernini had also helped the work of this fountain. The ship has a decoration of the bee, the symbol of the family Barberini. On top of the steps, there is the French Church of Trinità dei Monti On the top of the stairs, there is a France church, the church of Trinita' dei Monti (Chiesa della Trinita' dei Monti). This Gothic church had been completed in the late 16th century. At that time, between the Spanish Square and this church on the hill, there was a cliff separating the way. To resolve this inconvenience, France donated a grand staircase in 1725 hoping the peace between the Spain, which had had its embassy in this place, as well as France. The facade has a beautiful French design, simple and symmetrical. At that time, the two bell towers had each clock showing the time of Rome and the time of Paris. Now only the left one has remained. In front of the church there is a small square full of souvenir shops and portrait painters. In front of the square, shopping area is following The metro station Spagna on the line A is only 2 stations from the central Termini Station in Rome. In addition, the Spanish Square is surrounded by best known shopping venues. Therefore, many many people of Rome as well as tourists visit here every day. Via Condotti, one of the most luxury brand shops street, Via del Babuino and Via del Corso, where there are various popular shops etc. You can just enjoy window shopping alone. But it's considerable distance... Anyway, the Spanish Square's area has both a long history and a new fashion mode. It's full of lively people in the daytime and at night is illuminated by subdued lightings. It would be a representative place of amazing Rome for you.
When you come to Rome, please visit here In Rome, the Trevi Fountain is one of the places which you must visit. This spring is located at the end of ancient waterway Virgo. It was designed by Nicola Salvi, who won the contest in the middle of the 1700s. This place had become famous for the scene of "La Dolce Vita" of Federico Fellini. There is a legend saying that if you throw a coin into the fountain of your back, you would be able to come back again in Rome. The Ancient Rome had built in total 212 springs. The fountains remaining still now are often characterized by the Baroque style with vital movement of water. This fountain is also one of them. You can choose a different desire depending on the quantity of coins About the origin of the famous coin legend, it's not spoken well. There are lots of large and small fountains in Rome and throwing a coin into the fountain means a sacred tradition. That is considered as a custom to calm the spirit of the god enshrined in the fountain. In modern times, throwing one coin may realize that you would be able to come back to Rome again. And throwing two coins may realize that you would be able to stay with your lover forever. Three coins may make you separate from your disliking husbands or wives. A kind of luck charms, anyway. According to the municipality of Rome, those coins thrown in the fountain are collected and donated to charity associations. There is other varieties of anecdotes concerning this Fountain The Trevi Fountain has other legendary stories which are less known than the coins. One of those stories is: in the past, since this fountain's water was including no lime, it had been considered as the most delicious water in Rome. And people had used drinking this water. When many warriors had to go to the war, young girls gave a glass of this water as a proof of the sincerity to their lovers. And then the girls had broken the glasses praying for their future happiness. Now it's said that if you would drink this water from the right side of this fountain, you and your lover would be together forever. This water is also known as "L'acqua dell'amore (the water of the love)". "Asso di Coppe", Salvi's pot There is another less known anecdote. The right wall of the fountain has a vase-formed statue called "Asso di Coppe". This vase is very similar to the one of the marks of the traditional Italian card game. It's said that when the designer of this fountain, Salvi was producing his work, he was going to a barber near the fountain. And the barber was continuing to interfere about the design, Salvi decided to put something to block the view from the barber shop. The barber is not here now. But you can imagine where it was standing in front of this vase. The Trevi Fountain is a work of Bracci, designed by Salvi Salvi obtained the right of production of the Trevi Fountain by winning the contest, but he was ill and it was difficult to start practical works. And he was unfortunately died when only the base of the foundation was completed. The production was suspended and the base was left for some years. Finally Pietro Bracci resumed this big project and completed it in 1762. Thus, the Trevi Fountain is designed by Salvi and worked by Bracci. You know, a night face of this huge fountain is different. The Trevi Fountain illuminated up in blue is also very nice and romantic.
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Trevi Fountain
Piazza di Trevi
1462 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
When you come to Rome, please visit here In Rome, the Trevi Fountain is one of the places which you must visit. This spring is located at the end of ancient waterway Virgo. It was designed by Nicola Salvi, who won the contest in the middle of the 1700s. This place had become famous for the scene of "La Dolce Vita" of Federico Fellini. There is a legend saying that if you throw a coin into the fountain of your back, you would be able to come back again in Rome. The Ancient Rome had built in total 212 springs. The fountains remaining still now are often characterized by the Baroque style with vital movement of water. This fountain is also one of them. You can choose a different desire depending on the quantity of coins About the origin of the famous coin legend, it's not spoken well. There are lots of large and small fountains in Rome and throwing a coin into the fountain means a sacred tradition. That is considered as a custom to calm the spirit of the god enshrined in the fountain. In modern times, throwing one coin may realize that you would be able to come back to Rome again. And throwing two coins may realize that you would be able to stay with your lover forever. Three coins may make you separate from your disliking husbands or wives. A kind of luck charms, anyway. According to the municipality of Rome, those coins thrown in the fountain are collected and donated to charity associations. There is other varieties of anecdotes concerning this Fountain The Trevi Fountain has other legendary stories which are less known than the coins. One of those stories is: in the past, since this fountain's water was including no lime, it had been considered as the most delicious water in Rome. And people had used drinking this water. When many warriors had to go to the war, young girls gave a glass of this water as a proof of the sincerity to their lovers. And then the girls had broken the glasses praying for their future happiness. Now it's said that if you would drink this water from the right side of this fountain, you and your lover would be together forever. This water is also known as "L'acqua dell'amore (the water of the love)". "Asso di Coppe", Salvi's pot There is another less known anecdote. The right wall of the fountain has a vase-formed statue called "Asso di Coppe". This vase is very similar to the one of the marks of the traditional Italian card game. It's said that when the designer of this fountain, Salvi was producing his work, he was going to a barber near the fountain. And the barber was continuing to interfere about the design, Salvi decided to put something to block the view from the barber shop. The barber is not here now. But you can imagine where it was standing in front of this vase. The Trevi Fountain is a work of Bracci, designed by Salvi Salvi obtained the right of production of the Trevi Fountain by winning the contest, but he was ill and it was difficult to start practical works. And he was unfortunately died when only the base of the foundation was completed. The production was suspended and the base was left for some years. Finally Pietro Bracci resumed this big project and completed it in 1762. Thus, the Trevi Fountain is designed by Salvi and worked by Bracci. You know, a night face of this huge fountain is different. The Trevi Fountain illuminated up in blue is also very nice and romantic.
A temple living more than 2000 years, "Pantheon" The word Pantheon means "Temple dedicated to every god" in Greek. Today Italy is overwhelmingly Catholic country. However this building had been originally the Roman temple to honor Gods. Agrippa, the first Roman Emperor Augustus's brain had ordered in 25 BC. The original Pantheon was burned about 100 years later (80 AD). Then the emperor Hadrian had rebuilt it from 118 AD. Practically we can see this second Pantheon now. Also look out for Latin inscriptions of the triangular roof! On the triangular part of the roof of the Pantheon, there is an inscription in Latin as follows: M. AGRIPPA LF COS TERTIUM FECIT (Lucius's son Agrippa had built it during the third consul). M. AGRIPPA means Agrippa (Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa) mentioned above. Then L means Agrippa's father Lucius. F means FIGLIO (son). This inscription shows that the emperor Hadrian had respected the first builder Agrippa. Thanks for its beauty, the temple had survived Gradually the faith for Roman Gods had faded away and the faith of people became Christianity. Although this Pantheon had been originally built as a Roman temple, to protect its mystical beauty, the Christians had reused it into a Catholic church without destroying the architecture. A gaping hole in the ceiling The structure of this Pantheon can be explained simply: a combination of a triangle, a square and a sphere. Put a giant sphere into a big cube, and put a triangular roof in front. You can get an approximate shape of the building. Behind the triangular roof the top of the sphere should be seen. In addition, gape a big hole in the top. The effect of this hole to the inner space of the building is enormous. It's quite overwhelming. The highlight of the Pantheon would be this hole. You can be immersed in indescribable emotion just looking at the sun light shining through the hole. A secret of completion in a short-term? This hole has a diameter of 9 m and is called the "occhio (eye)" of the Pantheon. It's often used the Latin word "Oculus". The round form is considered a symbol of infinity and ubiquity. I wonder how they realized a roof of this particular form at that time without modern technology in the short term (10 years). One theory says; first of all, the cylindrical building had been built. Then they had filled this cylinder with a mixture of gold and the soil. After that, they had used this soil as scaffolds and put a dome of pumice stone on it as a roof. At last, the authority had permitted citizens to take the gold freely. Therefore, a cavity of the inside of the Pantheon had been achieved very rapidly. At that time the neighborhood of the Pantheon (especially the Rotonda Square in front) had been filled with free markets and people. The pope Alessandro VII had prohibited to open the markets to avoid too much bustle. Therefore, there would have been many poor people here, and this legend theory about the gold would be a truth. There is also a saying about Pantheon In the mid of the 19th century, the river Tevere often caused flooding. And this square often sank under the water. Still now, one of the walls surrounding the Rotonda Square keeps a stone tablet recording the highest water level at that time. The name of this square, Rotonda in Italian means a round, and Ritonna is Roman dialect. There is a Roman saying like this: Chi va a Roma e nun vede la Ritonna asino va e asino ritorna. "Who travels to Rome and doesn't visit the Pantheon, coming fool and leaving fool." It represents an irony of Roman people as well as their pride and respect to the Pantheon, symbol of the Rome. Barberini's error The Pantheon has been loved and protected by many Romans. However, there were also arrogant people. One of them is Urbano VIII of the Barberini family. He took away all of bronze decorations from the front of the Pantheon and converted into 80 cannons to set up in Castel S. Angelo. After removed the parts of the building, he put some iron doors and pink pillars inside. Those strange additional ornaments damage the harmony of the antique building. There are also the tombs of Raphael and Emanuele II From the late of 19th century, they started to burry some famous persons here. Like a famous artist Raphael, the king of Rome Vitorrio Emanuele II and Umberto I etc. In addition, there are many masterpieces of renowned artists like Caravaggio, Bernini, Velasquez, Vanvitelli and Canova. It's also held a Catholic ceremony "Rosa d'Ora" on the Pentecost Day once a year. To give an honor to the people who contributed to the Catholic Church, 700 million petals of red roses are thrown from the dome. Once this tradition was lost, but from 1995 it was restarted. A lot of people saw this beautiful sight also in 2010. Don't miss it! Rosa d'Ora itself can be also seen in other Catholic churches, but in the Pantheon you can admire a beautiful scene of red petals falling from the hole of 43.2m high. 43.2m is also a diameter of this dome, and indeed it's 1 m bigger than the cupola of St. Peter in Vatican. When you come to Rome, please come here! Please enjoy by yourself the shape which boasts simple yet overwhelming presence. Its strength under the dome is telling architectural beauty. A round blue sky through the Oculus will be surely one of the most beautiful memories of Rome.
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Panthon
Piazza della Rotonda
1352 lokalinvånare rekommenderar
A temple living more than 2000 years, "Pantheon" The word Pantheon means "Temple dedicated to every god" in Greek. Today Italy is overwhelmingly Catholic country. However this building had been originally the Roman temple to honor Gods. Agrippa, the first Roman Emperor Augustus's brain had ordered in 25 BC. The original Pantheon was burned about 100 years later (80 AD). Then the emperor Hadrian had rebuilt it from 118 AD. Practically we can see this second Pantheon now. Also look out for Latin inscriptions of the triangular roof! On the triangular part of the roof of the Pantheon, there is an inscription in Latin as follows: M. AGRIPPA LF COS TERTIUM FECIT (Lucius's son Agrippa had built it during the third consul). M. AGRIPPA means Agrippa (Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa) mentioned above. Then L means Agrippa's father Lucius. F means FIGLIO (son). This inscription shows that the emperor Hadrian had respected the first builder Agrippa. Thanks for its beauty, the temple had survived Gradually the faith for Roman Gods had faded away and the faith of people became Christianity. Although this Pantheon had been originally built as a Roman temple, to protect its mystical beauty, the Christians had reused it into a Catholic church without destroying the architecture. A gaping hole in the ceiling The structure of this Pantheon can be explained simply: a combination of a triangle, a square and a sphere. Put a giant sphere into a big cube, and put a triangular roof in front. You can get an approximate shape of the building. Behind the triangular roof the top of the sphere should be seen. In addition, gape a big hole in the top. The effect of this hole to the inner space of the building is enormous. It's quite overwhelming. The highlight of the Pantheon would be this hole. You can be immersed in indescribable emotion just looking at the sun light shining through the hole. A secret of completion in a short-term? This hole has a diameter of 9 m and is called the "occhio (eye)" of the Pantheon. It's often used the Latin word "Oculus". The round form is considered a symbol of infinity and ubiquity. I wonder how they realized a roof of this particular form at that time without modern technology in the short term (10 years). One theory says; first of all, the cylindrical building had been built. Then they had filled this cylinder with a mixture of gold and the soil. After that, they had used this soil as scaffolds and put a dome of pumice stone on it as a roof. At last, the authority had permitted citizens to take the gold freely. Therefore, a cavity of the inside of the Pantheon had been achieved very rapidly. At that time the neighborhood of the Pantheon (especially the Rotonda Square in front) had been filled with free markets and people. The pope Alessandro VII had prohibited to open the markets to avoid too much bustle. Therefore, there would have been many poor people here, and this legend theory about the gold would be a truth. There is also a saying about Pantheon In the mid of the 19th century, the river Tevere often caused flooding. And this square often sank under the water. Still now, one of the walls surrounding the Rotonda Square keeps a stone tablet recording the highest water level at that time. The name of this square, Rotonda in Italian means a round, and Ritonna is Roman dialect. There is a Roman saying like this: Chi va a Roma e nun vede la Ritonna asino va e asino ritorna. "Who travels to Rome and doesn't visit the Pantheon, coming fool and leaving fool." It represents an irony of Roman people as well as their pride and respect to the Pantheon, symbol of the Rome. Barberini's error The Pantheon has been loved and protected by many Romans. However, there were also arrogant people. One of them is Urbano VIII of the Barberini family. He took away all of bronze decorations from the front of the Pantheon and converted into 80 cannons to set up in Castel S. Angelo. After removed the parts of the building, he put some iron doors and pink pillars inside. Those strange additional ornaments damage the harmony of the antique building. There are also the tombs of Raphael and Emanuele II From the late of 19th century, they started to burry some famous persons here. Like a famous artist Raphael, the king of Rome Vitorrio Emanuele II and Umberto I etc. In addition, there are many masterpieces of renowned artists like Caravaggio, Bernini, Velasquez, Vanvitelli and Canova. It's also held a Catholic ceremony "Rosa d'Ora" on the Pentecost Day once a year. To give an honor to the people who contributed to the Catholic Church, 700 million petals of red roses are thrown from the dome. Once this tradition was lost, but from 1995 it was restarted. A lot of people saw this beautiful sight also in 2010. Don't miss it! Rosa d'Ora itself can be also seen in other Catholic churches, but in the Pantheon you can admire a beautiful scene of red petals falling from the hole of 43.2m high. 43.2m is also a diameter of this dome, and indeed it's 1 m bigger than the cupola of St. Peter in Vatican. When you come to Rome, please come here! Please enjoy by yourself the shape which boasts simple yet overwhelming presence. Its strength under the dome is telling architectural beauty. A round blue sky through the Oculus will be surely one of the most beautiful memories of Rome.
Campo de' Fiori Square was a flower garden Fiori in Italian means 吐lowers". Until about 1400 years ago, this square had been a vegetable and flower garden. That is the origin of the name. In another legend, one of the antique Roman politicians "Pompey the Great" had had a girlfriend "Flora", and her name had become the name of the square... It had flourished as a luxury area In 1456, Pope Caristus III ordered a development of this area Parione district. And this pavement square was born. After then, some important buildings like the palace of Orsini Family (Palazzo Orsini) were built around this square and it started to flourish. After these circumstances, this square became a gathering place for those in power like nobilities and ambassadors. For their convenience, a colorful market started to be held twice a week (Monday and Saturday). Near the square, hotels, restaurants and artisan shops began to gather and this area became a commercial and cultural center in Rome. Black period in the history, freedom of thought was prohibited The Campo de Fiori was also known as a place of execution during some historic period. On 17 February 1600, Giordano Bruno, a philosopher and a Dominican friar was sentenced to the stake here. He argued that the universe was infinite (at that time it had been considered finite) and defended the heliocentric theory of Copernicus. He had been sentenced to a heresy charge. Since after that he would not withdraw his theory, he became a martyr in this place. Then his bronze statue was made was built in the center of the square in order to remember this unfortunate history (in 1869, by Ettore Ferrari). After 1869, the square became a beautiful vibrant market. In 1943, here was used for shooting of a famous film "Campo de' fiori" of Anna Magnani and Aldo Fabrizi. Just looking at the markets makes you exciting! If you want to see a morning market in Rome, here this "Campo de' Fiori" would be the best. Colorful vegetables and fruits, beautiful flower shops as the name of the square shows, processed ham and cheese to enjoy at your hotel, as well as cloths and accessories for souvenirs and also general merchandise, you can find all kinds of goods in this market. Among them, a wine stopper with a decorative glass was especially attractive for me. It's made of stainless steel and is very solid, but costs only 5 euros! If you go to buy something like this at one of the stores in the city center, it would cost more than double price. After all, the market is for normal people. Why don't you use it to find some souvenir? It's also recommended to purchase souvenirs! In addition, they sell also spices by weight, cute shaped bottled limoncello (lemon liqueur) and balsamic vinegar, traditional boxed cakes etc. When you feel hungry, let's order an instant panini at one of meat shops there. All locals are enjoying this panino at the feet of the statue of Giordano Bruno. At the entrance of the Campo de' Fiori, on the north street, there is a bakery named "Forno Campo de Fiori". They sell fresh breads and pizzas at the next workshop. Its good fragrant of baked wheat attracts many people and invites into the shop. Let's try to taste their breads. It's simple and delicious. (Address: Piazza Campo Dei Fiori 22) Be careful while you're enjoying Near the square, there are also many boutiques and antique shops. Here is the best route for leisurely walks. Plus, there are lots of neat and delicious restaurants, too. You can enjoy a slow tourism. The market is vibrant and full of tourists, but just don't forget to keep your purse. It's easy to be targeted when you are concentrating on pictures. After dark, in this area many popular pubs start open and a lot of young people are gathering. Late at night here becomes a little bit chaotic with young guys and policemen... However, don't worry if it is about dinner time. It's very safe.
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Campo de' Fiori
Campo de' Fiori
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Campo de' Fiori Square was a flower garden Fiori in Italian means 吐lowers". Until about 1400 years ago, this square had been a vegetable and flower garden. That is the origin of the name. In another legend, one of the antique Roman politicians "Pompey the Great" had had a girlfriend "Flora", and her name had become the name of the square... It had flourished as a luxury area In 1456, Pope Caristus III ordered a development of this area Parione district. And this pavement square was born. After then, some important buildings like the palace of Orsini Family (Palazzo Orsini) were built around this square and it started to flourish. After these circumstances, this square became a gathering place for those in power like nobilities and ambassadors. For their convenience, a colorful market started to be held twice a week (Monday and Saturday). Near the square, hotels, restaurants and artisan shops began to gather and this area became a commercial and cultural center in Rome. Black period in the history, freedom of thought was prohibited The Campo de Fiori was also known as a place of execution during some historic period. On 17 February 1600, Giordano Bruno, a philosopher and a Dominican friar was sentenced to the stake here. He argued that the universe was infinite (at that time it had been considered finite) and defended the heliocentric theory of Copernicus. He had been sentenced to a heresy charge. Since after that he would not withdraw his theory, he became a martyr in this place. Then his bronze statue was made was built in the center of the square in order to remember this unfortunate history (in 1869, by Ettore Ferrari). After 1869, the square became a beautiful vibrant market. In 1943, here was used for shooting of a famous film "Campo de' fiori" of Anna Magnani and Aldo Fabrizi. Just looking at the markets makes you exciting! If you want to see a morning market in Rome, here this "Campo de' Fiori" would be the best. Colorful vegetables and fruits, beautiful flower shops as the name of the square shows, processed ham and cheese to enjoy at your hotel, as well as cloths and accessories for souvenirs and also general merchandise, you can find all kinds of goods in this market. Among them, a wine stopper with a decorative glass was especially attractive for me. It's made of stainless steel and is very solid, but costs only 5 euros! If you go to buy something like this at one of the stores in the city center, it would cost more than double price. After all, the market is for normal people. Why don't you use it to find some souvenir? It's also recommended to purchase souvenirs! In addition, they sell also spices by weight, cute shaped bottled limoncello (lemon liqueur) and balsamic vinegar, traditional boxed cakes etc. When you feel hungry, let's order an instant panini at one of meat shops there. All locals are enjoying this panino at the feet of the statue of Giordano Bruno. At the entrance of the Campo de' Fiori, on the north street, there is a bakery named "Forno Campo de Fiori". They sell fresh breads and pizzas at the next workshop. Its good fragrant of baked wheat attracts many people and invites into the shop. Let's try to taste their breads. It's simple and delicious. (Address: Piazza Campo Dei Fiori 22) Be careful while you're enjoying Near the square, there are also many boutiques and antique shops. Here is the best route for leisurely walks. Plus, there are lots of neat and delicious restaurants, too. You can enjoy a slow tourism. The market is vibrant and full of tourists, but just don't forget to keep your purse. It's easy to be targeted when you are concentrating on pictures. After dark, in this area many popular pubs start open and a lot of young people are gathering. Late at night here becomes a little bit chaotic with young guys and policemen... However, don't worry if it is about dinner time. It's very safe.
Vatican museums (Musei Vaticani) including the Vatican Palace are the largest museum of world history. The Vatican Pace has been used as a residence of the pope since the 14th century, when the pope had come back from Avignon in France. Now, most parts of this building are museums. In fact there are not only private rooms of Pope and offices of Vatican city but also 20 museums, art galleries and libraries inside. They conserve the ancient (Greek and Roman) sculptures, Egyptian arts, Etruscan arts, including contemporary Christian art... full of valuable works of art at various times. It's often said that it would take a week visiting carefully. This is no exaggeration, it would really take more than 7 days. Even if you visit these museums at a brisk pace, it takes two or three hours to get to the exit. In addition to the museums, you can visit Sistine Chapel known for paintings of Michelangelo, the Vatican Library and the Holy buildings (Borgia family's room, Nicholas V's Chapel and Rafael's room etc). Here is the headquarter of Catholic but as well as Christian art, you can admire pagan arts such as ancient Greece.
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Vatican Grottoes
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Vatican museums (Musei Vaticani) including the Vatican Palace are the largest museum of world history. The Vatican Pace has been used as a residence of the pope since the 14th century, when the pope had come back from Avignon in France. Now, most parts of this building are museums. In fact there are not only private rooms of Pope and offices of Vatican city but also 20 museums, art galleries and libraries inside. They conserve the ancient (Greek and Roman) sculptures, Egyptian arts, Etruscan arts, including contemporary Christian art... full of valuable works of art at various times. It's often said that it would take a week visiting carefully. This is no exaggeration, it would really take more than 7 days. Even if you visit these museums at a brisk pace, it takes two or three hours to get to the exit. In addition to the museums, you can visit Sistine Chapel known for paintings of Michelangelo, the Vatican Library and the Holy buildings (Borgia family's room, Nicholas V's Chapel and Rafael's room etc). Here is the headquarter of Catholic but as well as Christian art, you can admire pagan arts such as ancient Greece.
In summer, Italians become active when it becomes dark The night of Italian summer starts very late. It's getting dark very slowly. Then the activities of people at night continue almost eternally... The sunset is around 8 o'clock in the evening. Then, the sky is getting slightly darker and loosing brightness gradually until about 9 pm. Finally cool breezes start and from that time, you can feel cool air. And now the Italians are starting to enjoy summer evenings. What's the Open Opera? Open Opera means literally an opera which is performed outdoors under the sky. There are operas and ballets. Since it's an outdoor stage, the dress code is relatively casual. For opera beginners, it would be easy to try. The purpose of the open opera is that people can come to see opera much more relaxingly and the art of opera will become popular among everyone from kids to adults. Only July and August, when the Opera theater of Rome is closed Talking about Rome's famous Opera House, it would be Opera Theater. But during July and August it's closed. Instead, a kind of "Opera Festival" is held in this season. For the Open Opera, a big stage appears at the ancient Baths of Caracalla ruins. It's a nice entertainment of the summer night. Unexpectedly a night wind is cold In summer in Rome, the sun is shining very hard during the day. However, since humidity is low, under the shadows it's relatively cool. And in the evening, cool breeze starts to blows unexpectedly. The highlight of the Open Opera is to appreciate the opera of love story located at the ancient ruins with a mysterious night atmosphere. Watching the opera in the windy air, you can enjoy a sense of oneness with the theater. However, the performance lasts over three hours. It will finish around midnight. If you would like to wear an elegant sleeveless dress, it would be recommended to bring a shawl or a cardigan. Also for men it would be better to bring a jacket. Once you decide the performance, it's recommended to read its plot in advance Once you decide the performance, it's recommended to read its plot in advance! For many famous operas like Tosca, Carmen etc. there are various translated books, so it's recommended to understand the story. If you go to see the ballet, since there are really few words so it becomes impossible to understand the story without preparation. Instead, with a good preparation you would be able to enjoy not only the story but also lyrics and the splendor of the dancer's expression.
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Baden i Caracalla
Viale delle Terme di Caracalla
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In summer, Italians become active when it becomes dark The night of Italian summer starts very late. It's getting dark very slowly. Then the activities of people at night continue almost eternally... The sunset is around 8 o'clock in the evening. Then, the sky is getting slightly darker and loosing brightness gradually until about 9 pm. Finally cool breezes start and from that time, you can feel cool air. And now the Italians are starting to enjoy summer evenings. What's the Open Opera? Open Opera means literally an opera which is performed outdoors under the sky. There are operas and ballets. Since it's an outdoor stage, the dress code is relatively casual. For opera beginners, it would be easy to try. The purpose of the open opera is that people can come to see opera much more relaxingly and the art of opera will become popular among everyone from kids to adults. Only July and August, when the Opera theater of Rome is closed Talking about Rome's famous Opera House, it would be Opera Theater. But during July and August it's closed. Instead, a kind of "Opera Festival" is held in this season. For the Open Opera, a big stage appears at the ancient Baths of Caracalla ruins. It's a nice entertainment of the summer night. Unexpectedly a night wind is cold In summer in Rome, the sun is shining very hard during the day. However, since humidity is low, under the shadows it's relatively cool. And in the evening, cool breeze starts to blows unexpectedly. The highlight of the Open Opera is to appreciate the opera of love story located at the ancient ruins with a mysterious night atmosphere. Watching the opera in the windy air, you can enjoy a sense of oneness with the theater. However, the performance lasts over three hours. It will finish around midnight. If you would like to wear an elegant sleeveless dress, it would be recommended to bring a shawl or a cardigan. Also for men it would be better to bring a jacket. Once you decide the performance, it's recommended to read its plot in advance Once you decide the performance, it's recommended to read its plot in advance! For many famous operas like Tosca, Carmen etc. there are various translated books, so it's recommended to understand the story. If you go to see the ballet, since there are really few words so it becomes impossible to understand the story without preparation. Instead, with a good preparation you would be able to enjoy not only the story but also lyrics and the splendor of the dancer's expression.